Thursday, June 16, 2016

Charter advocates acknowledge ‘disturbingly low performance’ of virtual schools - The Washington Post

Charter advocates acknowledge ‘disturbingly low performance’ of virtual schools - The Washington Post:
Charter advocates acknowledge ‘disturbingly low performance’ of virtual schools


Full-time virtual charter schools have become increasingly popular during the past decade, now enrolling 180,000 students nationwide, students who learn by logging on to laptops from home instead of going to brick-and-mortar schoolhouses. But these schools’ growing enrollment has been accompanied by intense scrutiny: Journalists, activists and scholars have reported on virtual schools’ poor performance and raised questions about whether the schools are designed to effectively teach kids — or to effectively make a profit.
Now national charter-school advocates are calling for tighter oversight of virtual schools and closure of those that persistently fail, acknowledging that full-time virtual schools — most of which are run by for-profit companies — have “significant problems” and “disturbingly low performance.”
The Center for Research on Education Outcomes, which is generally seen as friendly to charter schools, found last year that students enrolled in full-time online charter schools learn far less than their peers in traditional public schools. The online charter students lost an average of about 72 days of learning in reading and 180 days of learning in math during the course of a 180-day school year, the study found. That is, in math, it’s as if the students did not attend school at all.
Charter advocates acknowledge ‘disturbingly low performance’ of virtual schools - The Washington Post:

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