Saturday, July 21, 2018

KIPP Refuses Agreement To Abide By Conflict of Interest Law; Gets Approved By State Board of Education | EduResearcher

KIPP Refuses Agreement To Abide By Conflict of Interest Law; Gets Approved By State Board of Education | EduResearcher

KIPP Refuses Agreement To Abide By Conflict of Interest Law; Gets Approved By State Board of Education



[Original Title]: Will KIPP Be Allowed To Bypass Conflict of Interest Law In Its Bid For State Funds?
[3/14/18] Update: The California State Board of Education has voted to approve two KIPP petitions to expand campuses into San Francisco and San Jose despite strong community resistance and knowledge of the charter chain’s refusal to agree to abide by a basic conflict of interest law – Government Code 1090. The following is an open letter that had been sent to the State Board of Education to urge a no vote on the expansions.   For related posts on past State Board of Education votes, see here and here.
______________________
Dear California State Board of Education Trustees,
We urge you to uphold local decisions by publicly elected board trustees to deny the KIPP charter petitions that will be up for appeal at your March 14th meeting.  San Jose’s East Side Union High School District has more charters than traditional public schools and is facing budget drains of over 15 million dollars per year as a result. Such losses impact valuable student supports, human resources, and programs. Charter schools are the recipients of millions of dollars of public funding, yet many insist on private governance without equivalent standards for transparency, open meetings, or compliance with conflict of interest laws. To see the impact of these lax governance and oversight policies as they have unfolded, consider the following:
1) NAACP Calls For a Moratorium on Charter School Expansion 
The following links lead to the official NAACP statement about the resolution and the original resolution with research links. See also the recent Task Force report/recommendations, which specifically highlight the importance of local governance in decision-making about charter schools.
KIPP is mentioned several times throughout this report (see refs for p. 7 and 21 in addition to the quotes below).

A study of KIPP charter schools – the largest corporate charter school chain in the U.S. – found that they enrolled a much lower percentage of students with disabilities (5.9%) than did their local public schools (12.1%). The same was true for English language learners (11.5% compared to 19.2%). p. 11   
and
“For example, the KIPP network of charter schools, well- known for their strict, military-style atmosphere,
 loses 15% of their students per year, far higher than their surrounding school districts.”



Related: 

Big Education Ape: A Topsy-Turvy Week for Charter Schools and School-Choice Tax Credits | Capital & Main - http://bigeducationape.blogspot.com/2018/07/a-topsy-turvy-week-for-charter-schools.html



Don’t Make Me Enforce School Uniforms. Just Let Me Teach. - NWLC

Don’t Make Me Enforce School Uniforms. Just Let Me Teach. - NWLC

Don’t Make Me Enforce School Uniforms. Just Let Me Teach.
Image result for school dress code enforced



A typical morning, when I was a middle school teacher, went something like this:
Arrive at school by 7:30 am. Run to the copier with any last-minute printing for my classes. Get back to my classroom by 7:50 when students begin arriving. Greet students. Remind them to bring necessary materials to class. Address any conflicts in the hallway while also keeping an eye on students already in the classroom. Make sure students are quiet enough to hear morning announcements. Observe student moods—does anyone seem off today? Sad? Angry? Check in with students individually. Offer encouragement. Diffuse tensions. Give warnings. Take attendance. Listen to whatever life updates, issues, and anxieties students bring to me that day. Provide informal counseling. Make note of anyone that needs extra assistance so I can follow up with them later. Find out which teacher is out that day and who needs me give up my lunch or prep period to cover their class.
Oh, and before the 8:00 am bell sends students to their first class, send an email to the front office naming which students are out of uniform.
In this email, I was required to note numerous and arbitrary uniform violations: who is missing their lanyard, whose shoes have the wrong color soles, who has a vest without the school logo on it, who doesn’t have a tie, who has the wrong brand pants, whose shirt isn’t tucked in. The list went on and on.
To my administrators’ eternal frustration, I did not send that email every day like I was supposed to. It was a miracle if I could even take attendance by 8:00 am instead of playing catch up in my lunch period (if I had one). And the problem wasn’t just time, though that was a huge factor. Writing that email made me feel uneasy. Don’t get me wrong; my problem wasn’t discipline—I was voted strictest teacher my very first year teaching. I had high standards, because holding students to high standards was one of my ways of showing them they mattered. I wasted no time in addressing disruption and disrespect in the classroom.
But this—this always felt different. I hated writing that “out of uniform” email. I internally raged about how it was a waste of time, which it absolutely was. More than that, it never felt right to listen to a student tell me about their most recent Continue Reading: Don’t Make Me Enforce School Uniforms. Just Let Me Teach. - NWLC




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