Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Broad's Boy Austin Beutner and UTLA Pres Alex Caputo-Pearl: Two leaders on a collision course toward a teachers strike - Los Angeles Times

Austin Beutner and Alex Caputo-Pearl: Two leaders on a collision course toward a teachers strike - Los Angeles Times

Austin Beutner and Alex Caputo-Pearl: Two leaders on a collision course toward a teachers strike


The two men who could determine whether Los Angeles teachers go on strike sound almost as if they inhabit different worlds. They don’t even agree on a set of basic facts, which makes negotiation difficult.
L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner speaks of a school system teetering on insolvency and failing so many students that aggressive changes are needed, including new ways to assess teachers and quickly push out ineffective ones.
Alex Caputo-Pearl, who leads the teachers union, says teachers at traditional public schools try valiantly but are besieged — even sabotaged — by outsiders who want to dismantle the district and by officials like Beutner who would rather stockpile money than use it to help teachers and make schools successful.
In the gulf between these competing realities, a teachers strike seems increasingly likely.
The tension between the two sides has been building at a fraught moment for the nation’s second-largest school system. Enrollment, which is the basis for funding, continues to decline because of population trends and the growing number of privately operated charter schools. And, as officials struggle to offset the problems that come with more than 80% of students living in poverty, student achievement remains well below state averages.
Both leaders believe they are at a crucial turning point that could lead either to disaster or Continue reading: Austin Beutner and Alex Caputo-Pearl: Two leaders on a collision course toward a teachers strike - Los Angeles Times


John Thompson: Data reveal opportunity gaps along demographic lines

Data reveal opportunity gaps along demographic lines

Data reveal opportunity gaps along demographic lines

Opportunity Gap - Overview | Schott Foundation for Public Education - http://schottfoundation.org/node/2744

In recent years, we have heard plenty of sad news about our home state. We learned in 2016 that life expectancies of poor Oklahomans were basically tied for the lowest in the nation. Life expectancy of poor women in Oklahoma City and Tulsa had dropped to the nation’s second and third worst, respectively. Life expectancy for poor men in Tulsa and Oklahoma City were fifth and seventh worst, respectively.
The latest database publicized in September found that life expectancy in Stilwell (56.3 years) is the nation’s lowest. Two other towns, Eufaula (59.5 years) and Checotah (58.1 years), are among the 10 towns with the lowest lifespans. I looked up my address in the database and found that the life expectancy for Oklahomans is 75.7, or about three years less than the rest of the country, and life expectancy in Oklahoma County is 75.8. In my ZIP code, the average person lives almost 80 years.
Then, I changed a couple of digits and checked out North Highland, a neighborhood about three miles north of my house and characterized as having “extreme poverty.” I learned that my former students disproportionately came from a ZIP code where life expectancy was 10 years less than in my neighborhood.
Similarly, a 2015 New York Times database showed that, in comparison to the rest of the U.S., an Oklahoma County boy from the top 1 percentile will make an additional $4,590 in annual income. Meanwhile, a poor boy growing up in Oklahoma County will make $1,850 less, meaning that his home county is in the bottom 13 percentile in offering economic opportunity.
Our education system is not reducing these opportunity gaps. In 2017, we learned that 4.2 percent of students at the University of Oklahoma come from the top “1 percent,” earning Continue reading: Data reveal opportunity gaps along demographic lines


On Demand Food Delivery Services In Gig Economy Disrupt Elk Grove Schools - Elk Grove Tribune

On Demand Food Delivery Services In Gig Economy Disrupt Elk Grove Schools - Elk Grove Tribune

On Demand Food Delivery Services In Gig Economy Disrupt Elk Grove Schools


High School lunches in Elk Grove just might be the latest, albeit unlikely, target of the ‘Gig Economy’.
It turns out Millennials aren’t the only ones taking advantage of today’s mobile on-demand food delivery services in a big way – Gen Z is here, and they want in on the action!
The convenience of being able to order almost anything to eat and have it delivered to you within minutes right from the palm of your hand — services made popular by well-known tech industry disruptors like Uber Eats and DoorDash – is, however, causing quite the conniption among at least some school officials in Elk Grove.
In a recent letter, Franklin High School Principal Chantelle Albiani asked for assistance from parents in curbing on campus food deliveries.
According to Albiani, the risks posed to school safety and security by food delivery services is a main concern, one she addressed directly in her letter.
“If the food is coming via a delivery service, we have no way to verify the person delivering the food is working for a legitimate company and is in fact delivering food”, Albiani wrote.
In today’s heightened school security environment, protecting students and faculty is a top concern and challenge Continue reading: On Demand Food Delivery Services In Gig Economy Disrupt Elk Grove Schools - Elk Grove Tribune
Image result for On Demand Food Delivery Services





Latest News and Comment from Education

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION
EduBloggers