Friday, March 3, 2017

The Next Step in the Trump-DeVos Plan to Send Taxpayer Money to Religious Schools | Mother Jones

The Next Step in the Trump-DeVos Plan to Send Taxpayer Money to Religious Schools | Mother Jones:
The Next Step in the Trump-DeVos Plan to Send Taxpayer Money to Religious Schools
Why Florida is the new darling for school choice boosters.

During his address before a joint session of Congress earlier this week, President Donald Trump paused to introduce Denisha Merriweather, a graduate student from Florida sitting with first lady Melania Trump. Merriweather "failed third grade twice" in Florida's public schools, Trump said. "But then she was able to enroll in a private center for learning, great learning center, with the help of a tax credit," he continued, referring to Florida's tax credit scholarship program that allows students attend private schools. Because of this opportunity, Denisha became the first member of her family to graduate from high school and college.
Trump used Denisha's story to call for his favorite education policy, school choice, asking lawmakers to "pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of African American and Latino children. These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious, or home school that is right for them."
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has also been pointing to Denisha and Florida in the past two weeks as a way to promote school choice. "Florida is a good and growing example of what can happen when you have a robust array of choices," DeVos told a conservative radio host on February 15. DeVos brought up the state's school choice model again during her speech to the leaders of historically black colleges earlier this week.
So what is it about Florida? For starters, the state offers many different types of school choice, including charter schools, vouchers for low-income students and those with disabilities, and tax credit scholarships. Charter schools, found in 43states and Washington, DC, represent the most common type of school choice. Vouchers are a little more complicated: They essentially operate like a state-issued coupon that parents can use to send their child to private or religious schools. The amount is typically what the state would use to send a kid to a public school. But vouchers are difficult to implement, because many state constitutions, like those in Michigan and Florida, have what are called Blaine Amendments, which prohibit spending public dollars on religious schools. And notably, only 31 percent of The Next Step in the Trump-DeVos Plan to Send Taxpayer Money to Religious Schools | Mother Jones:


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