Sunday, February 5, 2017

The Ballad of Joseph Olchefske: Middle College, Ed-Reform Market Failure, and the March of Online Learning. | Seattle Education

The Ballad of Joseph Olchefske: Middle College, Ed-Reform Market Failure, and the March of Online Learning. | Seattle Education:

The Ballad of Joseph Olchefske: Middle College, Ed-Reform Market Failure, and the March of Online Learning.

hello_my_name_failure
What do you think should happen in this scenario?
The superintendent of the largest school district in the state, through mismanagement and carelessness, runs up a crippling 35 million dollar deficit?
If you believe in the efficiency of the market, the answer should be easy.
The superintendent would be immediately fired. Since his actions lost the school district money or in business terms – became extremely unprofitable,  he would never again have a job related to education.
Meet Joseph Olchefske, an expert in finance, and a rising star in Seattle Public Schools in the late ’90s. After the untimely death of his mentor, John Stanford, Olchefske officially became Superintendent of SPS in February of 1999.
Within four years of his tenure, the district would be facing a 34 million dollar deficit and Olchefske would be on the receiving end of two separate votes of no confidence.
Here’s a timeline from the Post-Intelligence which documents the unravelling.
Timeline
Sept. 14, 1995: Seattle Schools Superintendent John Stanford appoints Olchefske to be chief financial officer for district. He had been a public-finance manager for brokerage firm Piper Jaffray in Seattle since 1986.
Nov. 28, 1998: Stanford dies of acute myelogenous leukemia.
Feb. 09, 1999: Olchefske, who had been interim superintendent after Stanford’s death, is named permanent superintendent.
Aug. 16, 2002: Olchefske’s chief financial officer, Geri Lim, resigns in exchange for $51,000, a letter of reference and $1,000 for job-hunting costs.
Oct. 4, 2002: Olchefske announces that accounting glitches and computer problems led to a $35 million budget shortfall.
Oct. 28, 2002: Principals Association of Seattle Schools votes against holding a no-confidence vote.
Nov. 1, 2002: Seattle School Board votes in support of Olchefske.
Nov. 05, 2002: Seattle Education Association, the teachers union, publicly calls for Olchefske to resign.
March 28, 2003: Principals Association executive board votes no confidence in Olchefske.
April 4, 2003: Teachers union votes no confidence in Olchefske. “I’m committed to being superintendent,” he responds.
April 14, 2003: Olchefske resigns.


Latest News and Comment from Education

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION
EduBloggers