Friday, December 16, 2016

Edujournalism and the Continuing Adventures in Post-Truth: Technology Edition | the becoming radical

Edujournalism and the Continuing Adventures in Post-Truth: Technology Edition | the becoming radical:

Edujournalism and the Continuing Adventures in Post-Truth: Technology Edition


Mainstream America appears, as usual, to be a bit behind the times, but in Trumplandia, there is a sort of shallow postmodernism going on (although postmodernism has been supplanted by post-postmodernism and a slew of other -isms since its heyday).
The media is, in fact, nearly consumed with a meta-analysis of itself as almost everyone has now confronted that the U.S. is a post-truth nation.
The handwringing is mostly shallow, mired in the false claims that post-truth is something new (the U.S. has always been post-truth) and that there are some fringe faux-news outlets (spurred by the evils of Social Media) that are spoiling the game for mainstream media (which ignores that mainstream media are just as complicit in post-truth as the extremes).
A subset of the failures of mainstream media is edujournalism, trapped in a both-sides mentality that masks its essential nature as press-release journalism.
Think tanks and entrepreneurs feed edujournalism, and edujournalism simply passes on the propaganda.
In post-truth Trumplandia, then, we now are confronted with what passes as credible edujournalism, an Orwellian formula that defies logic:
Earlier this week, Khan Academy, the College Board, and Turnitin released tools to give all students the chance to practice for the SAT without having to drop hundreds or even thousands of dollars to get the kind of relevant practice required. The companies have combined their technology tools to bring free Official SAT Practice to Khan Academy with added writing instructional tools provided by Turnitin. Read more details about the news here on The Tech Edvocate.
That’s right three discredited organizations—Khan Academy, the College Board/SAT, and Turnitin—have combined, according to Education Week to create equity because:
I’ve long been an outspoken advocate of technology tools for education. Technology can break down barriers, bring new materials and relevancy to instruction. It can excite students with its interactivity. It can help the teacher cut down on busy work and get right to the act of teaching and guiding students. And as in this case, technology–pretty exciting technology– is leveling the playing field for every student willing to invest their time in preparing for the SAT.
The basis for these grand, but false, promises is what can fairly be called post-truth—all belief not grounded in credible evidence.
Technology has been idealized for decades in education and has never fulfilled the educational promises, but has filled the coffers of technology commerce.Edujournalism and the Continuing Adventures in Post-Truth: Technology Edition | the becoming radical:


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