Sunday, December 18, 2016

CT Judges' anti-special education rant attracts federal government concern - Wait What?

CT Judges' anti-special education rant attracts federal government concern - Wait What?:

CT Judges’ anti-special education rant attracts federal government concern


Rather than properly rule that Connecticut historic underfunding of its public schools is unconstitutional and that Connecticut’s state government is failing to ensure  that every child is receiving their constitutionally guaranteed access to a quality education, a former state legislator and now Superior Court Judge handed Governor Dannel Malloy a victory – of sorts- in the CCJEF v. Rell school funding lawsuit by ruling that although Connecticut’s school funding formula was irrational and illegal, the amount of funding that the state provides Connecticut’s schools was “adequate.”
In his controversial ruling, Judge Thomas Moukawsher fixated on the need to teach children literacy and math, dismissing the importance of a comprehensive education or the availability services such as guidance counselors and the broader array of programs that Connecticut’s public school students need and deserve.
In addition, in what may have been the most disturbing aspect of this decision, the judge blasted Connecticut’s special education programs and suggested that a number of children simply didn’t deserve or need to have access to special education programs because, in his view, it was a waste to try and teach them.
Now, the federal government is responding to Judge Moukawsher’s inappropriate and heartless attack on children who require special education services.
The U.S. Department of Education wrote the state’s education commissioner this week to share concerns about a state judge’s order telling Connecticut lawmakers to reassess what level of 
CT Judges' anti-special education rant attracts federal government concern - Wait What?:


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