Sunday, June 5, 2016

With A Brooklyn Accent: Why Do Current School Policies Neglect What Works Best in High Needs Schools?

With A Brooklyn Accent: Why Do Current School Policies Neglect What Works Best in High Needs Schools?:

Why Do Current School Policies Neglect What Works Best in High Needs Schools?

In the course of the more than 300 oral history interviews we did for the Bronx African American History Project, we found that the greatest in school contributors to educational success, separate from family, church and neighborhood influences, were personal relationships developed with teachers, coaches, arts instructors and school counselors. Such relationships were mentioned in literally scores of interviews we conducted with Bronx residents, most of them African American, who grew up in the borough from the 1930's through the 1960's. They developed during school hours, in practices and rehearsals that took place after school, and during night centers and after school programs. In some of the interviews we conducted, mentoring by teachers, coaches, music instructors, and advisors to students publications was described as "life changing."
If this evidence is at all persuasive, and I think it is, then we need to ask why virtually every dominant education policy makes relationship building and mentoring so difficult. Today, many Bronx schools lack sports teams and arts programs, have revolving door teaching staffs, and lack the counseling staffs to With A Brooklyn Accent: Why Do Current School Policies Neglect What Works Best in High Needs Schools?:


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