Thursday, September 12, 2019

Rednecks, Hillbillies, and Crackers | radical eyes for equity

Rednecks, Hillbillies, and Crackers | radical eyes for equity

Rednecks, Hillbillies, and Crackers

Before my father graduated high school, he had a full set of false teeth. Finding—and later being able to afford—dentures that fit well were an important part of his life for sixty years.
Once his health began to deteriorate nearly as precipitously as his bank account in the last several years, that final set of dentures, lower quality and cost, made him look even less like himself than the disorienting transformation from aging and ill health—both making him enlarge, barrel-chested and swollen, as he simultaneously shrank in stature.
My father was a rough and rambunctious 1950s redneck growing up, losing teeth a few at a time from playing sports and the occasional fight. His dentist eventually decided to pull the last few and fit him with false teeth.
My mother, my sister, and I, then, never knew my father when he had teeth.
This was part of my 1960s childhood, a redneck life in Upstate South Carolina, my father’s home town. It seems fair to say that my mother was, as a North Carolinian raised mostly in Lexington and Lumberton, a hillbilly of sorts.
But theirs was no mixed marriage.
In fact, it took me many years, and well after I had moved out, to recognize CONTINUE READING: Rednecks, Hillbillies, and Crackers | radical eyes for equity

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