Friday, August 12, 2016

Why the election, the economy and how kids do in school are inextricably linked - The Washington Post

Why the election, the economy and how kids do in school are inextricably linked - The Washington Post:

Why the election, the economy and how kids do in school are inextricably linked


As should be obvious to anyone paying attention even the slightest bit of attention, authentic school reform can’t be just about evaluating teachers, creating new tests and setting content standards. Most kids who are sick, tired, anxious, depressed, hungry, distracted or homeless aren’t likely to be high academic achievers. Children’s performance in school is affected by the totality of their lives, and that means that reform has to be about more than just what happens inside a classroom.
This piece looks at the connection between the health of the U.S. economy and the health of kids. It was written by Leslie T. Fenwick,  dean emerita of the Howard University School of Education and a professor of education policy. This article contains excerpts from a policy monograph she authored titled, “Putting Schools and Communities on the Map: Linking School Reform, Neighborhood Revitalization and Community Rebuilding.”
By Leslie T. Fenwick
‎The nation’s economic health is intimately tied to children’s well-being and their shot at school success. A strong economy can provide funding for education and social programs that help kids develop, grow and feel safe. All children benefit when funding is available to support art and music instruction, quality after-school activities, healthy in-school meals programs, Head Start, Title I, and foster care and adoption.
The nation’s economic strength and children’s health and happiness should go hand-in-hand. For this reason alone, presidential candidates’ assertions about the future of jobs, international trade, and stock market performance must be well-informed and achievable. Political promises about the nation’s financial security cannot just be a call to believe in a return to the (presumable) good ole’ days.
Several weeks ago, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump went to Toledo, Ohio (and this week to Detroit, Michigan) promising jobs and resurrection of what used to be. For those of us who grew up in the Midwest, we know what used to be.
When my parents moved our family to Toledo in 1968, it was Glass Capital of the World, and national headquarters for Jeep, Champion Spark Plug, Dana Corporation, Owens Corning and Libby Glass. At that time, Toledo was not unlike other well-to-do cities in Ohio. Akron was Rubber Capital of the World with Goodyear and Goodrich headquartered there; J.D. Rockefeller established Standard Oil in Cleveland; and, Youngstown prospered with US Steel and Good Humor Ice Cream.
The nearby and booming Detroit auto industry meant that glass, rubber, power trains, and spark plugs needed to be made and sold. With jobs in the auto-affiliated industries aplenty Why the election, the economy and how kids do in school are inextricably linked - The Washington Post:

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION
EduBloggers

Latest News and Comment from Education