Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Schools are watching students' social media, raising questions about free speech | PBS NewsHour

Schools are watching students' social media, raising questions about free speech | PBS NewsHour:

Schools are watching students’ social media, raising questions about free speech

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JUDY WOODRUFF: But first: Schools are paying a lot more attention to what students post online, and that can have severe consequences for students and schools.
Harvard University withdrew the admittance of at least 10 incoming freshmen who had reportedly posted violent, racist and sexually explicit content in a private Facebook group.
High schools are cracking down, too, with some hiring outside companies to police social media posts.
But monitoring online behavior is difficult, and civil rights groups are watching.
Special correspondent Lisa Stark with our partner Education Week visited a school district in Arizona.
LISA STARK: It’s just before summer break at Dysart High School in Surprise, Arizona, outside Phoenix. Students are eating lunch, signing yearbooks, and they’re immersed in social media.
Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube. More than 90 percent of teens say they go online every day, and nearly a quarter are online almost constantly.
Let me ask you, first of all, do you all have phones?
STUDENT: Yes.
STUDENT: Yes, we do.
LISA STARK: Do you ever not have a phone with you?
STUDENT: No.
STUDENT: It’s always on.
LISA STARK: We sat down with four Dysart students to talk about how they use social media.
Snapchat, I post every single day, like, every day, all day.
STUDENT: I always like post my thoughts, certain way I’m feeling. Depends onSchools are watching students' social media, raising questions about free speech | PBS NewsHour:


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