Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Educators Dipping Into Their Own Pockets To Help Fill Funding Gaps

Educators Dipping Into Their Own Pockets To Help Fill Funding Gaps:

Educators Dipping Into Their Own Pockets To Help Fill Funding Gaps

students in high-poverty schools

There is an overwhelming consensus among public school educators that equity in education – access to the resources and opportunities that every student needs for success – should be a national priority, according to new survey by Scholastic. Ninety-seven percent of teachers and 98% of principals agree that more needs to be done to meet this urgent need. By equally significant numbers, however, educators report that obstacles exist in and outside of school, often regardless of poverty level.
“Educators are telling us that children are arriving at school in need of mental health services, living in poverty, or experiencing personal crisis – all conditions that create barriers to learning,” said Michael Haggen, Chief Academic Officer of Scholastic Education. The report is the result of a nationwide survey of 4,700 public school teachers and principals, conducted by Scholastic and YouGov and summarized in the Teacher and Principal School Report: Equity in Education.
“The report also shows us educators’ belief that given the right resources, including high-quality instructional materials, community and family partners, and professional development, they can provide a quality education for every young person who walks through their doors,” Haggen added.
The Scholastic survey results are collected under four main categories: Barriers to Equity, Families and Communities, Educators’ Funding, and Educators’ Commitment.     You can read the entire report here. In the meantime, here are a few highlights.

Outside Barriers to Learning Are Prevalent Across Poverty Levels

Eighty-seven percent of educators (teachers and principals) say many of their students face obstacles to learning that come from outside the school environment, and only 39% agree that most of their students start the year ready to perform grade-level work.
Not surprisingly, responses largely depended on where educators are employed. But even at low-poverty schools, 66% of both teachers and principals agreed or strongly agreed that outside factors – family crises, poverty, mental health challenges, lack of English language learning support – disrupt their students’ learning. At high-poverty schools, that number rises to 98%.

What Resources Are Not Adequately Available? Almost Everything

According to the Scholastic survey, high numbers of educators report that many of the resources necessary for student success are in short supply. While they point to a scarcity of school resources, critical resources outside the school are even less accessible to many students.
Credit: Teacher & Principal School Report (Scholastic, 2016)
Teacher & Principal School Report (Scholastic, 2016)
As school poverty increases, those resource disparities become more acute.
Credit: Teacher & Principal School Report (Scholastic, 2016)
Teacher & Principal School Report (Scholastic, 2016)

Year-Round Access to Books is Critical

According to the survey, the largest resource disparity based on school poverty level is access to fiction and non-fiction books at home. Sixty-nine percent of educators in Educators Dipping Into Their Own Pockets To Help Fill Funding Gaps:


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