Friday, August 26, 2016

Let white leaders defend institutional racism; let black leaders defend black lives

Let white leaders defend institutional racism; let black leaders defend black lives:

Let white leaders defend institutional racism; let black leaders defend black lives

Black educators cannot best serve their communities by doubling as shields for white organizations and institutionalized racism

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If one looks and listens closely, black reform advocates and charter leaders are responding to the mythology that black people don’t want charter schools or reform in general.

For most black folk, however, not liking reform equates to not liking institutional racism, which impacts our communities no matter how many black and brown people an organization hires. When black people say they don’t like education reform, they mean the trade-offs of institutionalized oppression are patently unacceptable.
Some may call it an untruth that black people and charter critics resist positive change; I call it a lie. Black folk have never been in a position to accept the status quo, and most black people applaud black people in our communities who teach, open charter schools or lead district-run schools. In addition, black educators have always excelled in spite of systems. We are never surprised and are always encouraged by black educators who make systems work—including those in charters. Therefore, any idea that not liking reform is somehow a refutation of black educators in charter schools is a terrible interpretation in the face of history.
When black people say, “I don’t like education reform,” they don’t mean individual black charter leaders are bad. They aren’t saying change isn’t needed. For many people, not liking education reform is really not liking the perfunctory rolling out of black educators who speak on behalf of white organizations. Instead of intentionally dismantling systemic and institutional oppression, black faces are placed at the helm of a crooked ship to convince us it’s smooth sailing.
The weight must be distributed effectively and equitably. White charter proponents must carry the burden of disenfranchised voters, fired teachers, supplanted black businesses and expelled students. Black educators cannot best serve their communities by doubling as shields for white organizations and institutionalized racism.
Hillary Clinton’s silence on K-12 education seemingly corresponds with a new chorus of criticisms. News21 recently put out a report on how school takeovers disproportionately affect poor, black communities. The NAACP called for a moratorium on charter schools, and the Black Lives Matter Collective issued its own rebuke. All of which echoes concerns within black communities, and rightfully so.
Black folk know too well that no matter how well-meaning white establishments are, they are not black ones. The hiring of black Let white leaders defend institutional racism; let black leaders defend black lives:

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