Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Jersey Jazzman: Teacher Pay, Student Poverty, and Inequitably Funded Schools: A Data-Driven Story From Chicago

Jersey Jazzman: Teacher Pay, Student Poverty, and Inequitably Funded Schools: A Data-Driven Story From Chicago:
Teacher Pay, Student Poverty, and Inequitably Funded Schools: A Data-Driven Story From Chicago



How much more abuse can Chicago's schools take?

Chicago Public Schools students protested Monday the “racist and discriminatory” firing of district teachers and staff, which they said disproportionately affect low-income schools.
At a rally held outside the Thompson Center, about a dozen young protesters called for quality education and funding to be provided in all schools. The district fired 508 teachers and 521 support staff earlier this month. [emphasis mine]
Before we take a data dive, let's acknowledge something important: every number in a staff cut represents an actual person. As Xian Barrett writes in The Progressive, the students who have developed personal connections to their teachers suffer the most when a teacher is laid off. So while I think there's value in the analysis I present below, let's not forget that we are talking about children and educators -- real people who are going through real hell.

The layoffs took place in an atmosphere of continuing friction between the Chicago Teachers Union and district leadership, who can count on the editorial board of theChicago Tribune, among others, to lay the blame for the district's continuing fiscal problems at the feet of the union:

The district is a candidate for bankruptcy. Chicago taxes already are rising, but CTU wants more. A CPS contract offer on the table since January is a sweet deal for educators; district CEO Forrest Claypool tells us it won't — can't — get sweeter. 
CPS' proposal offers teachers a generous raise and keeps paying them for added seniority and education. It does make a significant ask: Teachers would have to pay a 7 percent pension tab that CPS now pays but no longer can afford. CPS still would pick up the employer's share of pension costs but asks employees to pay their share. Most Chicagoans, most Americans, understand that, since they too have to save for their own retirement.
Note the framing here: the funding of Chicago's schools is an issue of teacher Jersey Jazzman: Teacher Pay, Student Poverty, and Inequitably Funded Schools: A Data-Driven Story From Chicago:




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