Wednesday, April 12, 2017

New Study: Why Teachers Created a New Genre: The “I Quit” Letters | Diane Ravitch's blog

New Study: Why Teachers Created a New Genre: The “I Quit” Letters | Diane Ravitch's blog:
New Study: Why Teachers Created a New Genre: The “I Quit” Letters


There is a photograph circulating on Twitter of a teacher recruitment fair in Michigan, in a large room with many tables staffed and ready for recruits. But the room is empty. It is a sad picture, dramatizing the effect of the current policy atmosphere on the profession.
Please note that the empty job fair was held in Michigan. That is Betsy DeVos’s home state. Apparently in her dream school of the future, computers will replace teachers. That has long been the gospel of Jeb Bush. If you harass teachers enough, they will go away and everyone can go digital.
A new study was just released by two professors at Michigan State University analyzing what they call a new genre: the teacher resignation letter.
I have posted many resignation letters on this site. They are usually anguished, sometimes angry, always sorrowful. They come from people who had a calling to teach, but could not stand the demands on them by administrators nor the frequency of high-stakes testing. Working in a climate that requires compliance and subservience, one that expects you to abandon your professional ethics, is not appealing for most professionals.
I have posted many such letters. The one that got the most overwhelming response was written by North Carolina teacher Kris Neilsen. It was published October 27, 2012, and received 165,000 views. Nearly 900 people commented on it. It went worldwide.
Here is the report on the teacher resignation letter as a genre:
In a trio of studies, Michigan State University education expert Alyssa Hadley Dunn and colleagues examined the relatively new phenomenon of teachers posting their resignation letters online. Their findings, which come as many teachers are signing next year’s contracts, suggest educators at all grade and experience levels are frustrated and disheartened by a nationwide focus on standardized tests, scripted curriculum and punitive teacher-evaluation systems.
Teacher turnover costs more than $2.2 billion in the U.S. each year and has been shown to decrease student achievement in the form of reading and math test scores.


“The reasons teachers are leaving the profession has little to do with the reasons most frequently touted by education reformers, such as pay or New Study: Why Teachers Created a New Genre: The “I Quit” Letters | Diane Ravitch's blog:
 Image result for I Quit

Latest News and Comment from Education

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION

LATEST NEWS AND COMMENT FROM EDUCATION
EduBloggers