Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Racial stereotyping can affect kids at every stage of life | Huffington Post

Why Some Kids Are Put In Special Education And Others In Gifted Programs | Huffington Post:

Why Some Kids Are Put In Special Education And Others In Gifted Programs

Racial stereotyping can affect kids at every stage of life.



When Rachel Fish was a special education teacher in New Mexico some years ago, her students didn’t look the rest of the school.
Fish, who taught in an elementary school filled mostly with Navajo, Latino and white students, said the kids in her classes were “more likely to be the students of color.” Even though the school staff was fiercely dedicated to the students, Fish says, she wondered if the demographics of the special ed classes were a result of more than just unequal performance. 
“As a staff we were working hard to provide the best educational experience for all of our students, but I wondered if we were unintentionally treating children differently for different reasons,” said Fish, now an assistant professor of special education at New York University. “I worried: Did I push some students harder? Did I accept lower performance among some students for inappropriate reasons?” 
Now, years later, Fish has conducted a study that adds credence to her fears. Her work, published last month in the journal Social Science Research, focuses on students who get referred for special education and students who are singled out for gifted testing.
Fish had a group of 70 third-grade teachers read fictional stories about boys who varied by academic ability, behavioral disposition and race. The characters were given names meant to signal their racial identities. In the end, the teachers were asked whether they would recommend the students for testing for special education programs or a gifted program.
The results were a mixed bag. When presented with stories of students who were struggling academically, teachers were more likely to recommend white boys for special education testing than boys of color. On the other hand, when asked to read stories about children with behavioral issues, teachers were more likely to refer black and Latino boys to special ed testing than they were white students. In cases of high-achieving students, teachers were more likely to refer white boys for testing into gifted and talented programs than they were boys of color.
Fish’s findings suggest certain patterns of implicit bias. She suspects that teachers are less likely to refer academically struggling students of color to special education because they might simply see those students’ low performance as normal.
“White boys with academic challenges are seen as requiring more help, with their academic needs seen as medicalized problems to fix, rather than the status quo,” Fish writes in the study. “Indeed, research indicates that children’s behaviors are perceived differently by their teachers depending on race/ethnicity, as teachers rate non-white students more poorly on behavioral outcomes, and perceive misbehavior Why Some Kids Are Put In Special Education And Others In Gifted Programs | Huffington Post:

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