Friday, May 19, 2017

New Study Finds That Bullying Remains High at School, But Has Declined Over Time = Education Law Prof Blog

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New Study Finds That Bullying Remains High at School, But Has Declined Over Time

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A new study on bullying at school offers both good and bad news.  The bad news is that bullying remains a constant aspect of daily life for many students at school.  Anywhere from 13 to 29 percent of students report being bullied in the last month.  Half of students indicated that they have witnessed bullying in the last month.  The good news is that these numbers are down from prior years.  Also, the vast majority of students feel safe at school, notwithstanding the prevalence of bullying.  The study explains:
This study examined the prevalence rates of 13 bullying-related indicators in a population-based sample over 10 years. Survey data from nearly one-quarter of a million students indicated that bullying has remained a prevalent, although declining, experience for school-aged youth. Specifically, 13.4% to 28.8% of students reported experiencing bullying in the past month, and approximately half of the students reported witnessing bullying. These estimates are consistent with recent bullying-prevalence reports, and they add to the current literature with the inclusion of a younger sample of youth. Despite these fairly high prevalence rates, the covariate-adjusted results for 10 of the 13 indicators suggested things may be getting better, as indicated by a reduction in bullying prevalence and related attitudes. The effect sizes of the change were in the small-to-moderate range (ranged 0.04–0.67) when comparing the first and last years’ data.
Some forms of victimization were commonly and consistently experienced across years (eg, relational). The prevalence of cyberbullying was consistently <10% and is comparable to the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics data. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that cyberbullying might increase, but consistent with the other forms of bullying, cyberbullying also decreased. However, given the rapid change of technology and new social media platforms used by youth and increasingly at younger ages, the nature and quality of cyberbullying may change; therefore, future studies should examine cyberbullying in greater detail (eg, broader definitions). Physical, verbal, and relational Education Law Prof Blog:

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