Saturday, January 28, 2017

School Transformation Hasn’t Worked—Isn’t That Reason Enough to Stop? - Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly

School Transformation Hasn’t Worked—Isn’t That Reason Enough to Stop? - Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly:

School Transformation Hasn’t Worked—Isn’t That Reason Enough to Stop?

Image result for doing things over and over again

Making America’s public education system great was the goal of Presidents Bush and Obama. President Trump also sees the problems in our public schools as needing action—so much so that he included his dire assessment of the current state of public education in his inauguration speech. Despite controversy about whether or not this is the province of the federal government, billions of dollars of federal money have been spent on efforts to improve our schools and make good on the promise that all children would receive a high quality education. “No Child Left Behind,” “Race to the Top,” “Every Student Succeeds”—these are the stirring titles given to a string of initiatives.
Some details differ, but common to all is a conviction that school problems are the result of internal weaknesses; poor teachers, bad principals, constraining union rules, and a lack of choice are the obstacles that must be overcome. The proven impact of external forces like poverty on student learning has been ignored. The consensus has been that radical change is necessary, that the traditional public school is no longer effective, and only disruptive change can cure the problems.
One of the Obama administration’s first efforts to move down this path was included as part of the $831 economic stimulus package passed to prod the economy back to life after the 2007 Great Recession. Within the $831 billion of stimulus investment was $100 billion focused on education. Part of this pool of funding was $3.1 billion for School Improvement Grants (SIG), which became “one of the Obama administration’s signature programs and one of the largest federal government investments in an education grant program.”
The SIG program awarded grants to states that agreed to implement one of four school intervention models—transformation, turnaround, restart, or closure—in their lowest-performing schools. Each of the models prescribed specific practices designed to improve student outcomes, including outcomes for high-need students.
Targeted at poorly performing schools, SIGs offered schools the choice of four highly disruptive strategies as the key to improvement. All the approaches see internal failure as the driving cause behind bad schools. They use test scores to sift out bad teachers from good, use charters to create better schools, and give tacit support to the attacks on the teachers’ unions many reformers have seen as essential to success. The U.S. Department of Education defined the strategies available to schools quite finely:
  • Transformation. This model required schools to replace the principal, adopt a teacher and principal evaluation system that accounted for student achievement growth as a significant factor, adopt a new governance structure, institute comprehensive instructional reforms, increase learning time, create community-oriented schools, and have operational flexibility.
  • Turnaround. This model required schools to replace the principal, replace at least 50 percent of the school staff, institute comprehensive instructional reforms, increase learning time, create community-oriented schools, and have operational flexibility.
  • Restart. This model required schools to convert to a charter school or close and reopen under the management of a charter management organization or education management organization.
  • School closure. This model required districts to close schools and enroll their students in higher-achieving schools within the district.
A $3.1 billion carrot was waved in front of cash-starved schools to entice them to try these approaches. Almost eight years later, we can now see the results, and they do not support School Transformation Hasn’t Worked—Isn’t That Reason Enough to Stop? - Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly:

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