Latest News and Comment from Education

Monday, August 17, 2020

Russ on Reading: Phonics, Fluency, and Flexibility

Russ on Reading: Phonics, Fluency, and Flexibility

Phonics, Fluency, and Flexibility



If you have ever read one of Peggy Parrish's delightful Amelia Bedelia books to young children, your efforts were no doubt greeted by howls of laughter. Children delight in the word play involved when Amelia "dresses the turkey" in coat and pants, or when she "pitches a tent" by throwing it poles and all, into the bushes. The children's delight comes, of course, from the humor derived from Amelia's totally literal understanding of words and the children's growing knowledge that words can have more than one meaning. If you are reading these books to first and second graders you may also notice that some children are not in on the joke. They may laugh along with others, but they may not yet have the cognitive flexibility to get the joke. 

Cognitive flexibility is defined as the ability to switch between thinking about two different concepts or to think about multiple concepts simultaneously. If you can't switch between two different concepts of "dress" or "pitch" you can't get the humor of Amelia Bedelia. Likewise, if you can't switch between two or more different concepts about how words are constructed, you will have great difficulty becoming a fluent reader. Recent research indicates that cognitive flexibility contributes to beginning reader's fluency, that low achieving readers lack cognitive flexibility, and perhaps, most importantly cognitive flexibility can be taught. (See References Below)

When you think about this it makes good sense. Phonics knowledge can only get us so far in decoding. If children approach every unknown word with CONTINUE READING: Russ on Reading: Phonics, Fluency, and Flexibility

Michael Bloomberg & Bill Gates The Brothers Grim: Bill and Mike’s Pandemic Panopticon – Wrench in the Gears

Michael Bloomberg & Bill Gates Doku: Willkommen in unserer techno-faschistischen Zukunft – Wrench in the Gears

Michael Bloomberg & Bill Gates Doku: Willkommen in unserer techno-faschistischen Zukunft
The Brothers Grim: Bill and Mike’s Pandemic Panopticon



Many thanks to Rudiger Flach for providing the following German translation of The Brothers Grimm: Bill and Mike’s Pandemic Panopticon. English version here.

Bill und Melinda Gates haben Hauptrollen in dem sich entfaltenden Drama Covid-19 zu spielen. Alles scheint entsprechend dem Plan von Davos voranzukommen. Das zuk├╝nftige Billion├Ąrspaar hat seinen Milliard├Ąrskollegen, die hinter der B├╝hne die Strippen ziehen, um die Kulisse der Vierten Industriellen Revolution f├╝r den techno-faschistischen zweiten Akt fallen zu lassen, eine n├╝tzliche Tarnung geboten. Schon jetzt versammelt sich in den Kulissen eine Chorus Line von Kontaktverfolgern. In K├╝rze werden sie im Zentrum der B├╝hne stehen und neu ausgearbeitete digitale Konformit├Ąts- und Indoktrinationszertifikate ├╝berreichen.
In diesem Beitrag geht es um einen der Verantwortlichen dieser Produktion, Michael Bloomberg. In Abstimmung mit dem New Yorker Gouverneur Andrew Cuomo bezahlte Bloomberg Johns Hopkins f├╝r die Choreographie dieser viralen ├ťberwachungsaktion, bei der die Rockefeller Foundation aus der K├Ânigsloge zuschaut.
Die John’s Hopkins School of Public Health hat diese Woche ein digitales Trainingsmodul zur Kontaktverfolgung auf Coursera hochgeladen. Die CONTINUE READING: Michael Bloomberg & Bill Gates Doku: Willkommen in unserer techno-faschistischen Zukunft – Wrench in the Gears

The Coronavirus Thanks You for Reopening Schools: “I Couldn’t Have Done it Better, Myself!” | gadflyonthewallblog

The Coronavirus Thanks You for Reopening Schools: “I Couldn’t Have Done it Better, Myself!” | gadflyonthewallblog

The Coronavirus Thanks You for Reopening Schools: “I Couldn’t Have Done it Better, Myself!”


Hey, American Peeps!
It’s me! Coronavirus!
Technically, the name’s Covid-19, but with you guys, we can cut the formality.
I mean after all, once I latched my spiky surface proteins to your nana’s lungs, we were basically family!
“YAK! COUGH!”
Music to my ears.
So it’s back to school time, and – let me tell you – am I ready to return to the classroom! Actually, I’m just bursting to pop onto campuses for the FIRST time this year.
When I came to these shores way back in March, some spoil sports decided to shut CONTINUE READING: The Coronavirus Thanks You for Reopening Schools: “I Couldn’t Have Done it Better, Myself!” | gadflyonthewallblog

Can Los Angeles Schools Test 700,000 Students and 75,000 Employees? That’s the Plan - The New York Times

Can Los Angeles Schools Test 700,000 Students and 75,000 Employees? That’s the Plan - The New York Times

Can Los Angeles Schools Test 700,000 Students and 75,000 Employees? That’s the Plan
Classes will start remotely. But the nation’s second-largest school district has perhaps the most ambitious plan to test students and employees for the coronavirus.



Amid public alarm over the inadequacy of coronavirus testing across the nation, Los Angeles schools on Monday will begin a sweeping program to test hundreds of thousands of students and teachers as the nation’s second-largest school district goes back to school — online.
The program, which will be rolled out over the next few months by the Los Angeles Unified School District, will administer tests to nearly 700,000 students and 75,000 employees as the district awaits permission from public health authorities to resume in-person instruction, said Austin Beutner, the district’s superintendent.
It appears to be the most ambitious testing initiative so far among major public school districts, most of which are also starting school remotely but have yet to announce detailed testing plans.
New York City, where the virus has been under control, is the only major school district in the country planning to welcome students back into classrooms part time this fall. The city is asking all staff members to be tested before school starts on Sept 10 and has said it will provide expedited results.

Staff members should be tested regularly throughout the school year, New York City has said. It is not yet clear how often students will be tested or whether the city will take random samples from the 1.1 million children at its 1,800 public schools.
Mr. Beutner said that Los Angeles’s program, developed over the past four months, would begin this week, well before schools are expected to let students into classrooms, and that it would augment — and probably far exceed — existing testing efforts run by the city and county of Los Angeles. CONTINUE READING: Can Los Angeles Schools Test 700,000 Students and 75,000 Employees? That’s the Plan - The New York Times

Online School Is Harder Thanks to Unequal Internet Access - The Atlantic

Online School Is Harder Thanks to Unequal Internet Access - The Atlantic

Online School Doesn’t Work When You Can’t Get Online
Why millions of American kids don’t have internet



At 8 a.m. Pacific time last Wednesday, I joined David Anderson’s 12th-grade government class at Live Oak High by clicking on a Zoom link.
Because California suffered a surge in coronavirus cases this summer, students in Live Oak, a town about 50 miles north of Sacramento, will be learning virtually for the foreseeable future. Both Anderson and his students seemed nervous about how it would go. At 8:03, only eight of the 24 students had logged on, despite the fact that Anderson’s “classroom expectations” sheet requested that everyone “log in to class on time and prepared every day.”
It might not have been the kids’ fault. Many students are poor in this rural chunk of the Sacramento Valley. The school ordered Wi-Fi hotspots for the students, but they won’t be available until August 22. In a class Anderson taught that afternoon, one boy’s video kept freezing from a slow connection. At the high point during the class I observed, 20 of 24 students had joined the Zoom session, which, Anderson told me later, is “better than expected.”
Not all distance learning in rural areas is functioning even this smoothly, thanks to America’s notoriously unequal internet access. In the COVID-19 era, life has moved to the internet, but not everyone has it. As many districts start virtually this fall, some teachers say they’re fighting to ensure that all of their students can log into class each day. Their struggles are just one example of the consequences of America’s failure to get all of its citizens online before this uniquely internet-dependent time.

Outside of Fresno, Rachel Cooper estimates that 20 percent of her eighth-grade students don’t have internet at home, and 20 percent have spotty internet. “It’s rough,” she says. Some kids are using their phones to log into class, but the screens are too small to do work on. Some kids’ internet cuts out in the middle of class, and others don’t log on at all.
The school hasn’t been able to provide hotspots to all of its students yet, Cooper says. A Wi-Fi–equipped bus is supposed to drive around to areas where disconnected students live, but social distancing would require that students sit outside of it to do their work. “I’ve had several students already say that they were really nervous they were going to fall farther behind in a specific subject because they think distance learning is going to be really difficult,” Cooper told me.
How did such an advanced country leave so many people technologically behind? Experts and former Federal Communications Commission officials describe a federal government that has neglected to treat broadband as a public utility, instead relying on the largely self-regulated internet industry to provide service wherever it wanted, for the price of its choosing. The United States government has historically not seen fast CONTINUE READING: Online School Is Harder Thanks to Unequal Internet Access - The Atlantic

Teacher Tom: Sitting, Facing Forward, While Muted

Teacher Tom: Sitting, Facing Forward, While Muted

Sitting, Facing Forward, While Muted



As most American schools gear up to start their school year engaged in what is being called "remote learning," educators and parents have been sharing schedules on social media that involve putting elementary school aged children in front of computers for upwards of four hours a day. That's a lot of screen time. That's a lot of sitting. That's a lot of facing forward. That's a lot of being muted.

Of course, it's not like our children weren't already spending most of their school time sitting, facing forward, muted. The only difference is the screen.

I've spent my entire professional life being appalled by the model of education used by most schools, a method that only "works" if children are sitting, facing forward, and being muted. It runs counter to what we know about what young children need and how they learn. Most children learn best when they are free to move their bodies. Most children learn best when they are free to follow their curiosity. Most children learn best when they are free to engage in a community of CONTINUE READING: Teacher Tom: Sitting, Facing Forward, While Muted

Anette Carlisle: Mike Morath’s Plan to Abandon Local Control and Public Schools in Texas | Diane Ravitch's blog

Anette Carlisle: Mike Morath’s Plan to Abandon Local Control and Public Schools in Texas | Diane Ravitch's blog

Anette Carlisle: Mike Morath’s Plan to Abandon Local Control and Public Schools in Texas



Anette Carlisle, public education advocate in Texas, describes how State Commissioner Mike Morath, a non-educator, bought into the anti-democratic strategy of killing local school boards and privatizing public schools. He swallowed whole the disruption program of the Center for Reinventing Public Education, one of the Gates-funded think tanks that call for the abandonment of public schools.
Despite a full decade of failure, phony “reformers” claim that education will improve if private corporations and entrepreneurs take over from elected school boards. It hasn’t worked anywhere, and it won’t work in Texas.
Carlisle writes:
Texas has chosen to abandon our local public schools, locally elected school boards, superintendents and our 5.4 million schoolchildren in favor of a “my way or the highway” single system directive by Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath. That’s why I’m standing up to say, “Whoa! Hold your horses, please, Mr. Commissioner.”
It’s an effort that’s been building for years, right under our noses. People said, “Surely not,” but here we are.

The Problems with “Show Me the Research” in Teaching Reading – radical eyes for equity

The Problems with “Show Me the Research” in Teaching Reading – radical eyes for equity

The Problems with “Show Me the Research” in Teaching Reading



I was born in 1961 and entered first grade in 1967, already able to read independently and play sophisticated card and board games.
My mother had taped index cards with words identifying objects all around our house. She had attended one year of junior college, but had no training in how to teach.
None the less, from the first day of school, I excelled in literacy, scoring in the 99th percentile on standardized tests. My learning to read has two important elements; I was of the generation taught by the Dick and Jane basal readers (whole-word focus over discrete phonics), and my learning to read overlapped with one of the most aggressive reading crisis moments in the U.S., spurred by Rudolf Flesch’s Why Johnny Can’t Read, first published in 1955.
To whom and what should we attribute my high-achieving literacy skills? How could research tease out any causal inferences about my reading achievement? I was certainly not a Johnny who couldn’t read even as I had almost no direct phonics instruction, and I am sure the basal readers and my teachers’ instructional methods had only minimal impact on my literacy development (other than that I loved Ms. Landford, my first grade teacher, and wanted desperately to please her).
Many years later, I was a high school English teacher in the rural high school I had attended. One year, a wonderful student whose mother was also an English teacher in the school scored a perfect 800 on the verbal section of the SAT.
People throughout the school and town often congratulated me and praised my role in her perfect score. For many, that student’s success was proof I was CONTINUE READING: The Problems with “Show Me the Research” in Teaching Reading – radical eyes for equity

Public funds should support public schools, right? Trump and DeVos say 'no.'

Public funds should support public schools, right? Trump and DeVos say 'no.'

Public funds should support public schools, right? Trump and DeVos say ‘no.’


This is a guest post by Sharon Krengel, Policy and Outreach Director of Education Law Center. See below for more on the Public Funds Public Schools campaign.
You’ve got to hand it to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
Even during a pandemic that’s hitting the U.S. hard and caused every state to physically close schools, she has not wavered from her agenda of using public dollars to subsidize private education. Her boss, President Trump, has spent the past few months trying to help her out, pushing private school voucher policies that have failed for years to gain congressional support.
Now come two federal bills that make no illusions about diverting taxpayer dollars to private schools, even though the nation’s public schools are struggling mightily to reopen their doors while simultaneously improving virtual learning for students who will still be at home.
Senate Republicans recently put forward a stimulus bill that would divert approximately 10 percent of the $70 billion earmarked for K-12 education to private schools. At the same time, Senators Lamar Alexander and Tim Scott have introduced a tax credit voucher bill that would divert $5 billion annually in federal tax reimbursements for contributions to organizations that give out private school vouchers.
Some state leaders aren’t waiting to see if either bill becomes law. The governors of South Carolina, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, and Florida have declared their intention to divert portions of their CARES Act funds—coronavirus relief aid passed by Congress earlier this year—to private school vouchers. In South Carolina, a judge put a temporary hold on Governor McMaster’s decision to use $32 million in pandemic aid for vouchers.
And a recent report showed that private schools across the country received between $2.67 and $6.47 billion from the Paycheck Protection Program, a source of federal pandemic aid under the CARES Act unavailable to traditional public schools.
What does all this mean? Already underfunded public schools, which are open to all and educate 90 CONTINUE READING: Public funds should support public schools, right? Trump and DeVos say 'no.'

I’m a Teacher and I’m Horrified at Schools Reopening During COVID

I’m a Teacher and I’m Horrified at Schools Reopening During COVID

I’m a Teacher and I’m Horrified at Schools Reopening During COVID
Educators took one look at the photos that recently emerged from the crowded, nearly mask-less hallways of a high school in Georgia, and gasped for air.



I keep thinking about a moment in my career in education, when I taught at a small Catholic school for girls in Queens, New York. On one otherwise unmemorable morning, a student in my homeroom slid off her chair and onto the floor, mouth foaming, body convulsing: Something in the pot she’d smoked on the way to school caused her to overdose. I carried her out of the stuffy room and into the hallway, all the while yelling for help. The girls in my homeroom crowded around, fanning us, opening her collar, pulling my hair out of my face as I tried to make sure she was breathing, alternately panicking and calming each other down.
I’ve always thought about this incident as a story of bravery—of teenagers coming together with no warning to help someone in need. But now what I keep thinking is: There were so many of us, sharing so little air.
For me, for most of us in education, this is an ordinary and an extraordinary time. Ordinary, because it’s August and thus time to get ready to go back to school as I have for the last 21 years. Making syllabi, stocking up on pens, and considering a new backpack all feel deeply familiar. But this is an extraordinary time, too, because of the COVID-19 pandemic and the utter chaos it has caused for parents, students, and educators.
The lack of realistic guidance has been shocking, and too many school administrators are apparently unable to think of any plan other than the “normal” beginning they hoped to have. The calendar seems to be pulling us towards a vortex where the ordinary and extraordinary will collide, when we’ll all be sharing too little air. It’s terrifying. Educators took one look at the photos that recently emerged from the crowded, nearly mask-less hallways of a high school in Georgia, CONTINUE READING: I’m a Teacher and I’m Horrified at Schools Reopening During COVID

Trump Brags About Racist Housing and Education Policies and Urges Americans to “Enjoy!” | janresseger

Trump Brags About Racist Housing and Education Policies and Urges Americans to “Enjoy!” | janresseger

Trump Brags About Racist Housing and Education Policies and Urges Americans to “Enjoy!”



In desperation, as polls predict he is likely to lose in the November election, President Donald Trump has not only threatened to defund the post office for the purpose of ensuring that a lot of votes won’t be counted, but he has also, shockingly, been appealing to racism.  He tweeted:
“I am happy to inform all of the people living their Suburban Lifestyle Dream that you will no longer be bothered or financially hurt by having low income housing built in your neighborhood… Your housing prices will go up based on the market, and crime will go down.  I have rescinded the Obama-Biden AFFH Rule. Enjoy!”
Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson explains the meaning of Trump’s tweet and refreshes our memories about the AFFH Rule: “Trump tweeted what may be the most nakedly racist appeal to White voters that I’ve seen since the days of segregationist state leaders such as Alabama’s George Wallace and Georgia’s Lester Maddox… Many people probably don’t know what the ‘Obama-Biden AFFH Rule’ is, but its roots are in the 1968 Fair Housing Act, specifically its Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing provision. That section of the law required federal agencies that deal with housing and banking to pursue their missions in a way that would actively desegregate housing.  In 2015, the Obama administration spelled out how communities should measure their progress, or lack thereof, in eliminating housing bias, and tied federal funding for housing and urban development to those measurements. Trump’s tweet is a promise not to actively enforce that provision. And it’s a message to White people that they can go ahead and do whatever they feel is necessary to keep Black people and Latinos from moving into their neighborhoods.”
Of course, Trump does not explicitly name race in his abhorrent tweet and he doesn’t mention segregation in the public schools.  In this one tweet, however, the President is explicitly CONTINUE READING: Trump Brags About Racist Housing and Education Policies and Urges Americans to “Enjoy!” | janresseger

Mr. G for District 3: Chris Guerrieri's Education Matters: IT IS Exactly like Florida is trying to get people killed

Mr. G for District 3: Chris Guerrieri's Education Matters: IT IS Exactly like Florida is trying to get people killed

IT IS Exactly like Florida is trying to get people killed



In the last week, Florida made three announcements that both don't make sense and will undoubtedly lead to sickness and perhaps deaths. In one district quarantined teachers are being required to go back into buildings to teach and yes read that again, the FSHAA has ignored the recommendations of their doctors and said HS sports can start and your governor has said schools with cases of COVID-19 shouldn't close. It's not like Florida is trying to get people killed, it is exactly like Florida is trying to get people killed. 

First, in a state where little makes sense, Martin County is requiring quarantined teachers to return to the classroom. It sounds like the first lesson the administrators in Martin County should learn is the definition of quarantine.

From WBPFnews,


The Martin County teachers union president says teachers under quarantine should not be forced to return to their school buildings to continue instruction.
Ninety students and six teachers at South Fork High School are now under quarantine after a student experienced symptoms of coronavirus. This latest exposure comes after some students at J.D. Parker Elementary School, Hobe Sound Elementary School and SeaWind Elementary School were possibly exposed to the virus, and told to quarantine. At least 150 students total are now under quarantine following these possible exposures, which have all occurred within the first week of school.
The Martin County School District released the following statement about the new exposures at South Fork High School:
“We have received inquiries about the status of the six teachers at South Fork and their status as CONTINUE READING: Mr. G for District 3: Chris Guerrieri's Education Matters: IT IS Exactly like Florida is trying to get people killed

God's Plan (A Requiem for Wendy Menard) | The Jose Vilson

God's Plan (A Requiem for Wendy Menard) | The Jose Vilson

GOD’S PLAN (A REQUIEM FOR WENDY MENARD)


On November 29, 2016, we had a Single Session workshop for the entire Math for America community entitled “A Continuing Conversation: Race, Equity, and STEM Education.” A few weeks prior, you witnessed the country that once felt so full of promise reject its stated values in favor of a man and an administration that outwardly espouses white supremacy and all of its branches. The rest of us had been so accustomed to your unassuming and pensive presence in the spaces you led. But on that night, you took the opportunity to speak up and loudly about the urgency of our conversation and why we were gathered. We could no longer settle for passive voices in the city and in the country you grew to love to grow disappointed in. An auditorium full of the most decorated educators in New York City was a captive audience while you held the tensions of being a white Jewish woman elevating her more racially marginalized counterparts while holding your white counterparts accountable to stepping up in the here and now. You hated crying in front of everyone but needed to use the stage to light a fire under as many (white) people’s pants as possible, perhaps including your own.
I was so glad to play second fiddle this time. You rarely go into situations without a plan. None of this was part of the plan.
The summer prior, we spent time at Twitter Math Camp where I both keynoted and hosted a workshop with you. What people may not understand about our collaboration is that we couldn’t be further apart when it came to preparation. For my keynote, I didn’t know what I was going to say until the night before, and even then I had no idea if I wanted to take more or less time. For our workshop, you wrote out the proposal, tapped my shoulder multiple times from proposal acceptance until an hour before the workshop started to make sure every part was in place. I liked the spontaneity of our interactions. You believed in structure and security. We did this dance the first time we worked CONTINUE READING: God's Plan (A Requiem for Wendy Menard) | The Jose Vilson


Are We Staring at Teacher Layoffs? Or, Worse? | Ed In The Apple

Are We Staring at Teacher Layoffs? Or, Worse? | Ed In The Apple

Are We Staring at Teacher Layoffs? Or, Worse?




Is “Black Tuesday” (Tuesday, October 29, 1929) hovering? Are we a few weeks or months away from the economic cliff?
The “roaring twenties,” seemingly endless increases in stock prices, three consecutive Republican presidents (Harding, Coolidge and Hoover), the flu pandemic was gone, a farm depression was concerning; however, the nation appeared to be booming.
On March 4, 1929, at his presidential inauguration, Herbert Hoover stated, “I have no fears for the future of our country. It is bright with hope.” Most Americans shared his optimism. They believed that the prosperity of the 1920s would continue, and that the country was moving closer to a land of abundance for all. Little could Hoover imagine that barely a year into his presidency, shantytowns known as “Homerville’s” would emerge on the fringes of most major cities, newspapers covering the homeless would be called “Hoover blankets,” and pants pockets, turned inside-out to show their emptiness, would become “Hoover flags.”
The stock market allowed anyone to buy stocks “on margin,” borrowing 90% of the cost of the stock from the broker, if the stock lost 10% of its value, the broker could sell the stock, the investor losing everything, for investors, seemed CONTINUE READING: Are We Staring at Teacher Layoffs? Or, Worse? | Ed In The Apple

NYC Public School Parents: $1.1 million court settlement by Success Academy charters for violating children's rights

NYC Public School Parents: $1.1 million court settlement by Success Academy charters for violating children's rights

$1.1 million court settlement by Success Academy charters for violating children's rights



Gary Rubinstein broke the story on his blog today that Success Academy had agreed to pay $1.1M and reasonable attorneys’ fees to five families, whose children had their rights repeatedly violated and were pushed out of the Success Academy Fort Greene charter school, the home of the infamous “Got to go” list.  Success agreed to settle the case, Lawton vs. Success, after nearly five years of delays before the case even came to trial, rather than deliver the evidence to the plaintiffs that the court ordered.  Here are more details and court filings.
Here is the August 2018 decision by the US District Court Judge, Fredrick Block, who refused Success’ request to dismiss the case, and instead described the horrific treatment that these five children with disabilities were subjected to starting at the age of four and five, including repeatedly being removed from class early, dismissed, suspended and denied their mandated services. 
Here is the February 2020 acceptance by the families of Success’ Offer of Judgement of $1.1 million plus reasonable attorney fees; which the charter chain chose to provide before going to trial, rather than release the full documentation ordered by the Court, which would further detail the abusive treatment of these children.
To this day, Success has refused to pay the attorneys’ reasonable fees, so here is the most recent court filing by the families’ attorneys from Advocates for Justice, NY Lawyers CONTINUE READING: NYC Public School Parents: $1.1 million court settlement by Success Academy charters for violating children's rights

CURMUDGUCATION: Country Club Pod School

CURMUDGUCATION: Country Club Pod School

Country Club Pod School



So you run a string of private tony country clubs, offering "unique access to sports, fitness, luxury hospitality and family-friendly amenities across multiple clubs," and the pandemic has not been very helpful for your business. But you've got all this space. What can you do to get the money stream flowing again?

Open a school, of course.

Let me introduce you to the Bay Club, an organization offering 24 clubs across 9 campuses, including Portland, Marin, San Francisco, East Bay, Santa Clara, San Jose, Los Angeles, San Diego, and the Peninsula campus. They all sound pretty swanky, but as a sample, here's the Peninsula Campus description:


The Peninsula Campus is designed as an ultimate escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. With two premier properties and endless amenities and services, the Peninsula Campus offers a state-of-the-art tennis facility, as well as year-round fitness, aquatics, and family programming. With over thirteen acres between two Bay Club locations, there are plenty of ways for you and your family to play.

On that particular campus, you can join the Redwood Shores club at various levels of swankitude, from individual dues as low as $280/month up to $950/month (on the low end, there is also a $1,000 "initiation fee") with assorted benefits for CONTINUE READING: 
CURMUDGUCATION: Country Club Pod School

A VERY BUSY DAY Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... The latest news and resources in education since 2007

 Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... | The latest news and resources in education since 2007


A VERY BUSY DAY
Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
The latest news and resources in education since 2007
 
 


Perfect Example Of Current Event “Argument From Ignorance” Fallacy To Use In TOK Classes
White House Chief-of-Staff Mark Meadows gave all teachers a great, though sad, example of the “ argument from ignorance ” fallacy this weekend: You can learn more about this fallacy here . I’m adding this post to The Best Multimedia Resources For Learning About Fallacies — Help Me Find More .
“Q&A Collections: Entering the Teaching Profession”
Q&A Collections: Entering the Teaching Profession is the headline of my latest Education Week Teacher column. All Classroom Q&A posts on Entering the Teaching Profession (from the past nine years!) are described and linked to in this compilation post. Here’s an excerpt from one of them:
Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL
BiljaST / Pixabay Six years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention. You might also be interested in THE BEST RESOURCES, ARTICLES & BLOG POSTS FOR TEACHERS OF ELLS IN 2019 – PART ONE and THE BEST RESOURCES, ARTICLES & BLOG POSTS FOR TEACHERS OF ELLS IN 2019 – PART TWO. A
My Best Posts About The The School Closure Crisis & Distance Learning
geralt / Pixabay I’ve been writing about, and posting a lot, about distance learning over the past several months. You can find nearly eighty related posts at my Ed Week Teacher column at All Classroom Q&A Posts on the Coronavirus Crisis . You can find all the related “Best” lists at Best Lists Of The Week: Teaching Online Amid School Closures . And you can find a number of related videos I did w
Monday’s Four “Must-Read” Articles & “Must-Watch” Videos About Reopening Schools In The Fall
TheAngryTeddy / Pixabay Here are new additions to THE BEST POSTS PREDICTING WHAT SCHOOLS WILL LOOK LIKE IN THE FALL : Back to ‘school’: Even the basics are complicated, so how can teachers and students get on track? is from The Seattle Times. Boston refused to close schools during the 1918 flu. Then children began to die. is from The Washington Post. Los Angeles Schools Start Classes With Ambitio
Guest Post: Making Every Student Feel “Seen & Valued” This Year
Editor’s note: Because of a miscommunication, I received this post to late to include in my Ed Week series answering the question “What key lessons that you learned in the spring are you planning to bring to the new school year and what will they look like on a day-to-day basis?” But it’s an important post, and the authors agreed to let me post their response here. William Haithcock is the princi
Most Popular Posts Of The Week
I’m making a change in the content of the regular feature. In addition to sharing the top five posts that have received the most “hits” in the preceding seven days (though they may have originally been published on an earlier date), I will also include the top five posts that have actually appeared in the past week. Often, these are different posts. You might also be interested in IT’S THE THIRTE
Assessment & Homework In The Age Of COVID-19
Wokandapix / Pixabay Our first day of class is September 3rd, so it’s beginning to get “real.” I did my first phase of class planning in last July (see HERE ARE DETAILED – & TENTATIVE – DISTANCE LEARNING PLANS