Thursday, September 24, 2020

CURMUDGUCATION: Arne Duncan's New Corporate Edu-biz Job

CURMUDGUCATION: Arne Duncan's New Corporate Edu-biz Job

Arne Duncan's New Corporate Edu-biz Job



f there's one thing we know about folks in the education disruption biz, it's that they are remarkably adept at finding work no matter how much failure they pack into their CV.


Yes, it's freakin' hilarious.
And so it is with little surprise that we note that Arne Duncan has picked up a new job as the chairman of the board for FullBloom. This comes on top of his job as a partner of the Emerson Collective, Laurene Powell Jobs's--well, we need a new name for something that "uses philanthropy, impact investing, and promoting policy solutions to reimagine some of society's most calcified systems and create new possibilities for individuals, families, and communities."

Here's what CEO Jeffrey Cohen has to say about the momentous acquisition:

“Having a thought leader like Arne help guide our decisions through this time of unprecedented educational disruption is vital as we work to ensure both the safety and engagement of our students,” said CEO Jeffrey Cohen. “We are delighted to welcome Arne to the board. This appointment makes us better as an organization because we know he will hold us to the highest standards when it comes to producing results for the children and clients we serve.”



Yes, Duncan is apparently a thought leader now. Who'd have guessed.

So what is FullBloom? It's a sort of edu-biz conglomerate, a company that has grown through CONTINUE READING: CURMUDGUCATION: Arne Duncan's New Corporate Edu-biz Job

What will a Biden/ Harris Secretary of Education look like? The opposite of DeVos. - Education Votes

What will a Biden/ Harris Secretary of Education look like? The opposite of DeVos. - Education Votes

What will a Biden/ Harris Secretary of Education look like? The opposite of DeVos




By Amanda Menas
During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever for local communities to have the power to make decisions for our public schools and be responsible for the education of all students. ALL students should have the legal right to access high-quality learning experiences, but long standing, systemic structures continue to interfere with access to education and opportunity for students of color, and they must be intentionally dismantled. However, the current administration has refused to listen to the educators, the professionals who know the names of the students in their classrooms. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been distracted by voucher schemes that result in negative impacts on our students, ignoring the growing and often race-based gaps in school funding, programs, and services. We can look to her experiment in Michigan to find the most tragic and cautionary tale.
The future Secretary of Education must fully embrace their roles and responsibilities of curing persistent and often intentional educational inequities so that all students have access to what the best public schools offer. The Biden/Harris administration has already committed to just that. Here are five ways Vice President Joe Biden and his running mate Senator Kamala Harris will make changes to the Department of Education to best support our students and educators:

Biden will fire DeVos on Day One

Joe Biden told then-NEA President Lily Eskelsen García that on his first day in office he would fire Betsy DeVos and nominate an educator for Secretary of Education. With his commitment to including educators in the conversation, a pro-public education ally in Biden’s cabinet would center issues facing students and educators regularly. 

The Department of Education will be Educator-Oriented

“Education should be put more in the hands of educators. You should have more input on what you teach, how you teach it, and when you teach it. You are the ones in the classroom, you should have more input,” Biden said at the NEA 2020 Virtual Representative Assembly in July. He continued, “This is going to be a teacher-oriented Department of Education, and it’s not going to come from the top down—it’s going to come from the teachers up.” Biden also reiterated that when federal funding is allocated to schools, educators should have a say in how it is spent in their local districts.

Biden is pro-public education, DeVos strips funding

Betsy DeVos supports the growing inequality of our public schools and what is referred to as the “Education Industry.” She has schemed to defund public schools — particularly in poor black and brown communities — to build a critical mass of dissatisfaction with neighborhood public schools and increase support for privately managed charters. Where DeVos encourages educators to leave the profession, forces a test-and-punish system, and cuts necessary programming for students, Biden promises to close educator pay gaps, increase diversity, and has promised that he will end federal funding for for-profit charter schools.

Joe and Jill Biden visit schools, DeVos ignores our students

During a 60 minutes interview, Betsy DeVos said “I have not intentionally visited schools that are underperforming.” With Dr. Jill Biden, an educator and long-time NEA member, as first lady, there will always be a partner to educators in the White House. At the beginning of the 2020 school year, Jill embarked on a two-week tour visiting in-person and virtually schools across the country to listen to educators during their first ever virtual or hybrid school year. As someone who taught in a public school, Jill understands the needs of educators and students and the resources they need to be successful. DeVos never attended a public K-12 school, her children never attended public schools, and she never taught in a public school, making her totally disconnected and unqualified to lead the Department of Education and keep our students safe.

Biden rewards educators, DeVos punishes them

Teachers shouldn’t have to worry about how they are going to make their student loan payments while they are busy educating the next generation,” said Biden. He promises to fix the existing Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, and simplify it so it actually helps educators. DeVos has denied educators their earned benefits through loopholes and flawed implementation, and has recommended that the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program be eliminated
What will a Biden/ Harris Secretary of Education look like? The opposite of DeVos. - Education Votes


Turning Point USA: Aiming to Win | The Crucial Voice of the PeopleThe Crucial Voice of the People

Turning Point USA: Aiming to Win | The Crucial Voice of the PeopleThe Crucial Voice of the People

Turning Point USA: Aiming to Win




Turning Point USA fits the criteria of an astroturf — fake grassroots — organization. But what makes them a real danger are three things: their strategies, target audience, and mode of operations. Even real Republicans have warned about this far-right danger. It behooves us all to take note!
Turning Point USA (TPUSA) began with the discovery of a charismatic young speaker named Charlie Kirk by Tea Party activist William (Bill) Montgomery. Through Montgomery, Kirk became further connected to the influential and well-to-do. Together they launched TPUSA in 2012. Montgomery left TPUSA in April and recently died due to COVID-19.
In Kirk’s telling, he started the group in his parents garage as a teenager in Chicago and grew it to be a powerful political force through sheer grit and hard work.”

John Thompson: Reflecting on “The Lost Year” for Students | Diane Ravitch's blog

John Thompson: Reflecting on “The Lost Year” for Students | Diane Ravitch's blog

John Thompson: Reflecting on “The Lost Year” for Students




John Thompson, historian and retired teacher in Oklahoma, read the New York Times Magazine’s report on the possibility of a “Lost Year” and wrote these reflections:
Three times, I had to take a break from reading the New York Times Magazine’s special education issue, “The Lost Year.” The Magazine’s powerful reporting delivered gut punch after gut punch, forcing me to put the magazine down, calm myself, and contemplate the suffering our children are enduring.
Three times, as these compelling and emotionally overwhelming student stories hit home, I would get sick at my stomach. I’d sense anxiety growing to the point where it hit as hard as when ideology-driven, Trumpian policies are announced. As these tragedies unfolded over recent months, I got into the habit of taking a break, breathing heavily, and relaxing, resulting in naps to calm my nerves.
The anecdotes in “The Lost Year” illustrating the damage being done to our most vulnerable children hit me especially hard because of decades working in the inner city and our most disadvantaged schools. But I must warn readers who may not have been covered by so CONTINUE READING: John Thompson: Reflecting on “The Lost Year” for Students | Diane Ravitch's blog

A parent-led effort to close the digital divide for Spanish speaking families

A parent-led effort to close the digital divide for Spanish speaking families

A parent-led effort to close the digital divide
For many Spanish-speaking families, getting technology for remote learning has been tough, so a Nevada parent launched her own initiative to help


When the Clark County School District in Las Vegas announced it would be staying entirely remote this year, mother and education advocate Valeria Gurr was immediately concerned about how the decision would affect low-income and Spanish-speaking families, especially those with students who are English language learners. She worried that the district might fail to provide enough support, as it did in the disastrous transition to remote learning last spring, when one third of the district’s 314,848 students never got online because they didn’t have the technology, according to reporting from the Las Vegas Sun.
For English language learners, who make up more than 5 million students in public schools across the country, the transition to remote learning has been particularly hard.
The district has been trying to avoid a repeat of the March transition, offering low-income students thousands of devices it was able to purchase with the help of federal dollars. But, despite handing out about 10,000 devices a day in the weeks leading up to the schools’ remote reopening, the district had still failed to reach some 19,000 students who were waiting for a device as of August 24, when classes began, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.
Gurr, a Latina who still views herself as an English language learner, speaks to low-income families regularly in her role as the Nevada state director for the nonprofit Nevada School Choice Coalition, a project of the American Federation for Children. Although her 3-year-old son hasn’t yet entered the public schools, she’s heard from many parents how challenging the transition to virtual learning was last spring. Many had trouble coping, even though they had resources to draw on, she said. “Imagine what it is for Hispanic families that don’t speak English and … don’t have the technology.”
Curious to know how many families in her community were still struggling, Gurr turned to a social media group she had started for Spanish-speaking parents for an answer. The group, “CCSD Padres y Madres,” has grown from 200 parents to a little over 1,200 parents in just a few weeks. Gurr asked group members if they had a laptop. The response CONTINUE READING: A parent-led effort to close the digital divide for Spanish speaking families

Mozert v. Hawkins County Public Schools (The Tale of the Troubling Textbook) - Part Three | Blue Cereal Education

Mozert v. Hawkins County Public Schools (The Tale of the Troubling Textbook) - Part Three | Blue Cereal Education

Mozert v. Hawkins County Public Schools (The Tale of the Troubling Textbook) - Part Three





his Is Not About Monkeys

Monkey CourtWhile researching what I hope will be an upcoming book about the “wall of separation” as it relates to public education, I came across as case which has fascinated me far out of proportion to its actual importance. Since I try to keep the published stuff concise and balanced and semi-professional, I’m getting the rest of it out of my system here.
You’re welcome.
I’ve already written about Mozert v. Hawkins (6th Circuit, 1987) in Part One and Part Two, and fully intend to wrap it up here in this final post – so you can realistically expect Part Four sometime early next week. *sigh*

The Story So Far

Parents in Hawkins County, Tennessee, led by Vicki Frost, objected to a literature textbook being used in their kids’ public school. The families were fundamentalist Christians, and the stories in the reader were all about imaginary places and events, appreciating different cultures, and asking important questions about what’s truly important – the antithesis of their faith, they insisted. When the school refused to let their kids opt out of using this particular book, they took them to court.
The case began in the Eastern District of Tennessee under Judge Thomas Hull. He rejected a number of their complaints as outside the purview of the federal bench, CONTINUE READING: Mozert v. Hawkins County Public Schools (The Tale of the Troubling Textbook) - Part Three | Blue Cereal Education

Teacher Tom: As If I Did Not Exist

Teacher Tom: As If I Did Not Exist

As If I Did Not Exist



I was hanging out with a group of kids on the playground, including a two-year-old girl I had just met. At some point she began to dance the way one does when nature calls. I knew she was relatively new to the world of underwear. I prompted, "Do you need to go potty?" She nodded so I said, "The toilet is inside."

We were a long way from the door, as far as one can be on the playground. She began heading that way, albeit without urgency, stopping here and there for a closer look, picking up stray items, but otherwise making her way in the general direction of the bathroom.

I'm not an expert in helping kids make the transition from diapers to underpants, but I've spent a lot of time around children who are in the process of learning. I know that many of them are still accustomed to being accompanied by an adult. I know that many can get distracted. I know that accidents happen, even with seasoned veterans. For these reasons I kept an eye on her as she made her way, knowing that she might need a reminder or a helper or some other support along the way. She didn't. When I later told her mother, she informed me that it wasn't the first time that she had demonstrated this sort of independence, but she was nevertheless impressed, as she should be: not every two- CONTINUE READING: 
Teacher Tom: As If I Did Not Exist

School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'? | 89.3 KPCC

School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'? | 89.3 KPCC

School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'?




From shiny red pencils reading "My Attendance Rocks!" to countless plaques and ribbons and trophies and certificates and gold stars: For as long as anyone can remember, taking attendance — and rewarding kids for simply showing up — is a time-honored school ritual.
For good reason: Just being there, day in, day out, happens to be one of the most important factors that determines a child's success in school. And average daily head count forms the basis of school funding decisions at the federal, state and local level.
Yet now, like so many other aspects of education, that simple measure — "here" or "absent" — is not so simple anymore. States are having to update their attendance policies to cover the realities of virtual learning. And where school is being held in-person, strict coronavirus health protocols mean students must now stay home at the slightest sign of illness, or to quarantine in case of a potential exposure.
So the emerging questions for educators and parents are: What is the best way to measure whether students are participating in learning? And who will be held responsible for a student who doesn't participate? The student? Their caregiver? The school?
It all adds up to "a paradigm shift," says Hedy Chang,who directs Attendance Works, a national and state level initiative that treats attendance as a key lever to student success. It was Chang's research in the mid-2000s that helped lay the groundwork for the current policy focus on chronic absenteeism. She found that missing more CONTINUE READING: School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'? | 89.3 KPCC

NYC Educator: The Chancellor Buys Non-Cut and Paste Software

NYC Educator: The Chancellor Buys Non-Cut and Paste Software

The Chancellor Buys Non-Cut and Paste Software



Dear Colleagues,

As you know, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a grave impact on our economy and the budge of New York City’s government, including the DOE. However, we’ve notice that someone has been parodying my Very Important Letters. Therefore we’ve taken immediate and decisive action.

For now and going forward, we’re devoting ourselves to a new program in which my email can be neither forwarded, nor copied and pasted. Therefore no one will be able to copy my emails and make fun of them. The cost of this program is in the tens of millions, but we’ve found a way to make up a fraction of the expenses.

All managerial and non-represented City employees—meaning employees who are not union members—will be required to take five unpaid workdays as furlough between October 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021. This means that people like me, who make $345,000 a year will have to get by on maybe 340, and people working hand to mouth with no contract are screwed, but hey, no more nasty parodies from uppity school teachers.

We don’t expect staff to work on furlough day. We are incredibly understanding. Low-salaried non-union workers are free to take day trips and place them on their expense accounts. Excuse me, my secretary informs me they CONTINUE READING: 
NYC Educator: The Chancellor Buys Non-Cut and Paste Software

Bill Gates Is Still Dabbling in Common Core | deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

Bill Gates Is Still Dabbling in Common Core | deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

Bill Gates Is Still Dabbling in Common Core




Billionaire Bill Gates doesn’t use the term “common core” much anymore, but he still dabbles.
In 2008, he agreed to bankroll the effort. Over the next several years, in his effort to “release powerful market forces” because “scale is good for free market competition,” Gates spent roughly $200M to cement Common Core as a fixture in American K12 education.
Gates is no longer dropping hundreds of millions of dollars on Common Core. Still, it seems that he feels some obligation or interest or fancy in investigating Common Core “adoption behaviors.” So, in May 2019, Gates paid $250K to the Innosight Institute “to study the adoption behaviors of districts who are now using high quality common core curriculum and better understand their ‘switching behaviors'”:

Innosight Institute Inc


Date:  May 2019
Purpose:  to study the adoption behaviors of districts who are now using high quality common core curriculum and better understand their “switching behaviors”
Amount:  $248,703
Term: 17
Topic: K-12 Education
Program: United States
Grantee Location: Lexington, Massachusetts
Innosight Institute was “founded on the theories of Harvard professor Clayton Christiansen,” who is none other than the originator of the idea of “disruptive innovation,” which only sounds like a swell education theory to those who view CONTINUE READING: Bill Gates Is Still Dabbling in Common Core | deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

CURMUDGUCATION: DeVos Has No Plan

CURMUDGUCATION: DeVos Has No Plan

DeVos Has No Plan



t's a brief three and a half minute interview on Fox's "The Daily Briefing," but in just a few quick questions, Dana Perino pushes Betsy DeVos to show that during this pandemic, families with concerns about school are on their own.

The spot opens with a quick clip from an Alabama infectious disease expert explaining that you kids "pose an even bigger risk than college students." Dr. Michael Saag warns  of a "silent epidemic" within K-12 arena. Saag says we knew what was going on in colleges because we are testing and quarantining, "but in K through 12 we're not doing that."

Now here comes DeVos.

Perino asks: Do you have concerns as well about the younger kids that are going back to school?

I'm going to transcribe DeVos's non-answer in its entirety so that you don't think I cherry-picked my way around her actual answer to the question. Spoiler alert: if you've heard DeVos say anything in CONTINUE READING: 
CURMUDGUCATION: DeVos Has No Plan





REPRESENTATIVE MARK WHITE’S INCREDIBLY FANTASTIC PROM DATE – Dad Gone Wild

REPRESENTATIVE MARK WHITE’S INCREDIBLY FANTASTIC PROM DATE – Dad Gone Wild

REPRESENTATIVE MARK WHITE’S INCREDIBLY FANTASTIC PROM DATE



“Any idiot can face a crisis; it’s this day-to-day living that wears you out.”
― Anton Chekhov
Yesterday Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn made a long-anticipated appearance before the Tennessee House Education Committee as part of their Summer study. Luckily she had Memphis State Representative and Education Committee Chairman Mark White to serve as her escort for the affair. White for his part did everything but present her with a corsage before presenting her to Committee.
Throughout the proceedings, he did everything he could to ensure the commissioner emerged unscathed. At one point he diffused criticism by comparing her to past officeholders,
“You are in a very tough position. I’ve been here for 11 years. Commissioner (Kevin) Huffman went through the same thing. Commissioner (Candice) McQueen went through the same thing,” White said. “It’s a very tough position. I’ve been around you enough to know your heart is in the right place and you want to make a difference.”
If only throughout my life I’d have been afforded jobs based on my heart as opposed to my CONTINUE READING: REPRESENTATIVE MARK WHITE’S INCREDIBLY FANTASTIC PROM DATE – Dad Gone Wild

Jeff Bezos wants to start a school for kids whose families are underpaid by people like Jeff Bezos - The.Ink

Jeff Bezos wants to start a school for kids whose families are underpaid by people like Jeff Bezos - The.Ink

Jeff Bezos wants to start a school for kids whose families are underpaid by people like Jeff Bezos
A free crash course in why generosity is no substitute for justice




Apropos of:
I am hereby providing this free “Winners Take All” crash course for Jeff Bezos.
1. Helping cause a problem isn't a qualification to "solve" it.
2. We don't need you to give back, we need you to take less.
3. Generosity isn't a substitute for justice.
4. Pay taxes.
5. Don't bust unions and then open a school to serve people whose families don't have money because you and your friends busted unions.
6. The education of children should not be turned into a drive-through reputational laundromat for plutes.
7. Pay your taxes.

CAA for Science Item Content Specifications - California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) System (CA Dept of Education)

CAA for Science Item Content Specifications - California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) System (CA Dept of Education)

CAA for Science Item Content Specifications
Item content specifications describe how CAA for Science items are developed to assess the alternate standards derived from the California Next Generation Science Standards (CA NGSS).




The California Alternate Assessment (CAA) for Science item content specifications provide details on each assessed alternate standard (i.e., Science Connector) and are derived from the CA NGSS. The Science Connectors align with the needs of students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and serve as a basis for the assessment. Due to the structure of the CAA for Science (i.e., embedded performance tasks only), these item content specifications are a subset of the complete set of Science Connectors. The complete set can be found in the Preliminary Science Core Content Connectors and Essential Understandings(DOCX) document. More information about the design of the CAA for Science can be found in the CAA for Science Blueprint(DOCX) document.
Educators can use the item content specifications to gain a better understanding of the assessment targets (i.e., focal knowledge, skills, and abilities [FKSAs]—which describe what students should know and be able to do in science—and the essential understandings [EUs]—which are the basic key ideas or concepts students should know in science). In addition, educators can use these item content specifications, along with the 2016 Science Framework for California Public Schools, as resources for developing items for interim, benchmark, and summative assessments for classroom use. The item content specifications are not intended to guide instruction.

Background

The item content specifications, based on the Science Connectors, are used to develop the CAA for Science embedded performance tasks. These item content specifications provide item writers with the details on each assessed Science Connector by providing assessment targets, possible phenomena, and any relevant Environmental Principles and Concepts associated with the Science Connector.
The grade five CAA for Science performance tasks draw on Science Connectors from grades three through five and include the foundational concepts that are addressed in kindergarten through grade two. The grade eight performance tasks draw on Science Connectors from grades six through eight, and the high school performance tasks draw on Science Connectors from grades nine through twelve.
One CAA for Science item content specification was written for each of the 83 Science Connectors (i.e., 23 for grade five; 28 for grade eight; and 33 for high school) that will be assessed on the CAA for Science over a five-year period. The item content specifications will be updated annually on the basis of input from California educators.
Grade Five Assessment
There are 23 Science Connectors that may be assessed on the CAA for Science for grade five; these item content specifications are presented individually and by content areas.
GradeEarth and Space Sciences (ESS)Life Sciences (LS)Physical Sciences (PS)Engineering, Technology, and Application of Science (ETS)
3
Not applicable3‑LS1‑1(DOCX)
3‑LS2‑1(DOCX)
3‑LS3‑1(DOCX)
3‑LS4‑2(DOCX)
3-PS2-1(DOCX)3-5-ETS1-1(DOCX)
3-5-ETS1-2(DOCX)
3-5-ETS1-3(DOCX)
4
4‑LS1‑1(DOCX)4‑PS3‑2(DOCX)
4‑PS3‑3(DOCX)
4‑PS4‑2(DOCX)
Not applicable
5
5‑ESS1‑2(DOCX)
5‑ESS2‑1(DOCX)
5‑ESS2‑2(DOCX)
5‑ESS3‑1(DOCX)
5‑LS2‑1(DOCX)5‑PS1‑1(DOCX)
5‑PS1‑2(DOCX)
5‑PS1‑3(DOCX)
Not applicable



Middle School (MS) Assessment
There are 28 Science Connectors that may be assessed on the CAA for Science for grade eight; these item content specifications are presented individually and by content areas.
GradeESSLSPSETS
MS
MS‑LS1‑1(DOCX)MS‑LS1‑2(DOCX)MS‑LS1‑7(DOCX) MS‑LS1‑8(DOCX)MS‑LS2‑1(DOCX)MS‑LS2‑2(DOCX)MS‑LS2‑3(DOCX)MS‑LS2‑4(DOCX)MS‑LS3‑2(DOCX)
MS‑LS4‑6(DOCX)
MS‑PS1‑2(DOCX)MS‑PS1‑6(DOCX)MS‑PS2‑1(DOCX)MS‑PS2‑2(DOCX)MS‑PS3‑2(DOCX)MS‑PS3‑3(DOCX)MS‑PS4‑2(DOCX)MS-ETS1-1(DOCX)MS‑ETS1-2(DOCX)
MS‑ETS1‑3(DOCX)
MS‑ETS1‑4(DOCX)



High School (HS) Assessment
There are 32 Science Connectors that may be assessed on the CAA for Science for high school; these item content specifications are presented individually and by content areas.
GradeESSLSPSETS
HS
HS‑ESS1‑1(DOCX)
HS‑ESS1‑4(DOCX)
HS‑ESS1‑5(DOCX)
HS‑ESS2‑2(DOCX)
HS‑ESS2‑3(DOCX)
HS‑ESS2‑5(DOCX)
HS‑ESS3-1(DOCX)
HS‑ESS3‑3(DOCX)
HS‑ESS3‑6(DOCX)
HS‑LS1‑2(DOCX)HS‑LS1‑4(DOCX) HS‑LS1‑6(DOCX)
HS-LS2-2(DOCX)HS‑LS2‑4(DOCX)HS‑LS2‑8(DOCX)HS‑LS3‑2(DOCX)
HS-LS4-3(DOCX)
HS‑LS4‑6(DOCX)
HS‑PS1‑1(DOCX)HS‑PS1‑4(DOCX)HS‑PS1‑8(DOCX)
HS-PS2-1(DOCX)HS‑PS2‑3(DOCX)HS‑PS2‑6(DOCX)HS‑PS3‑4(DOCX)HS‑PS3‑5(DOCX)HS‑PS4‑3(DOCX)HS‑PS4‑5(DOCX)
HS-ETS1-1(DOCX)
HS‑ETS1‑2(DOCX)HS‑ETS1‑3(DOCX)
HS‑ETS1‑4(DOCX)



Appendix
Questions:   California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress | caaspp@cde.ca.gov | 916-445-8765
Last Reviewed: Thursday, September 24, 2020


CAA for Science Item Content Specifications - California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) System (CA Dept of Education)