Saturday, October 19, 2019

School effectiveness linked to diversity in Stanford study

School effectiveness linked to diversity in Stanford study

School effectiveness linked to diversity in Stanford study


Stanford University’s Educational Opportunity Project database gives a best estimate of the effectiveness of every elementary and middle school in the nation. Its recently released evaluation of test score growth from 2009 to 2016 further explains what it really takes to provide equal educational opportunity. Researchers Sean Reardon, Ericka S. Weathers, Erin M. Fahle, Heewon Jang, and Demetra Kalogrides also provide a diagnostic tool for assessing the relative effectiveness of individual schools.
Before wrestling with what is required to bring equity to the nation, Oklahomans can find data on how each of our own schools is doing. Oklahoma City Public School students scored 1.62 grade levels below the U.S. average. Average OKCPS scores were .68 grade levels lower than districts with similar socioeconomic status, and their learning rates were about the same.
Tulsa had more advantages and less poverty, but its scores were .81 grade levels lower than districts with similar socioeconomic status. Its racial and economic achievement gaps were worse, and poor students declined further in comparison to similar districts.

Reviewing the OKCPS numbers

Since my background is secondary education, I’ll briefly summarize the data for all five middle schools in northeast Oklahoma City.
The students at Northeast Academy, Centennial, Rogers, and Douglass scored .71, .91, .91, and 1.2 grade levels below other schools with similar free/reduced-price lunch percentages. KIPP students scored 2.93 grade levels higher than schools with similar free/reduced-price lunch percentages, and its “learning rate” metric was higher.
Northeast scores declined by 0.02 grade levels compared to schools with similar CONTINUE READING: School effectiveness linked to diversity in Stanford study

No comments:

Post a Comment