Friday, October 12, 2018

We’ve known since the 1940s that kids don’t do well in school when they’re hungry

We’ve known since the 1940s that kids don’t do well in school when they’re hungry

We’ve known since the 1940s that kids don’t do well in school when they’re hungry


National School Lunch week is here (October 15-19), a time for shining the spotlight on this essential program that feeds hungry children.

For just a moment, let’s take a step back in time to see what President Harry Truman and the United States Army were doing about school lunches in the fall of 1946.
Truman had recently signed the National School Lunch Act, which provided meals for needy children.  This meant free or reduced price school lunches for children of families living in poverty. The school lunches meant better health and education.
“The well-nourished school child is a better student. He is healthier and more alert. He is developing good food habits which will benefit him for the rest of his life” explained the President.

Truman sought to spread the initiative as far as possible. This was vital for the health of children, and of the nation.
President Truman proclaimed “The school lunch program provides a cooperative means of assuring adequate nutrition for millions of our children who otherwise might be denied this basic need.”
But Truman also cautioned that more needed to be done. Hunger is relentless.  We must keep advancing school feeding. Truman said “This is a splendid start, but we must look forward to the day when the lunches are available in every community in every State and territory.”
Our National School Lunch Program has been expanded in the decades since Truman. Thirty million children depend on these meals during the school year today. But the Continue reading: We’ve known since the 1940s that kids don’t do well in school when they’re hungry




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