Saturday, June 12, 2021

THIS WEEK WITH NEWBLACKMAN (IN EXILE) #BLM #BLACKLIVESMATTER

 NewBlackMan (in Exile)


THIS WEEK WITH NEWBLACKMAN (IN EXILE)




Great Grief with Nnenna Freelon: Light And Shadow
' Through his work as a photographer and architect, Phil Freelon taught Nnenna Freelon about the interplay between light and shadow, a lesson that guided them through the highest and lowest moments of his ALS journey. She reflects on how his talent opened the door to the opportunity of a lifetime — being on the design team for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Cultur
Invisible Blackness – Becoming Culturally Competent with Dr Melina Abdullah
' As Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles, Dr. Melina Abdullah is an expert on race, gender, class, and social movements. As a Co-founder and organizer of the Black Lives Matter movement she continues to inspire the Los Angeles chapter with her poignant intellect, passion and leadership. In this episode host Adrian Younge speaks with Dr. Abdullah
Cops In The Classroom: Why Students Are Protesting School Resource Offic
'School resource officers are meant to protect the student body and ensure the school community’s safety, but some students consistently feel threatened by the presence of law enforcement roaming their classrooms. Host Kamaya Truitt talks with WUNC education reporter Liz Schlemmer and youth reporting mentor Caitlin Leggett about why some students are uncomfortable with the prevalence of school re
Black Music Month Honors the Black Artists Who Have Shaped Music
'June marks #BlackMusicMonth—an annual celebration of Black musicians, producers, songwriters, and more. Started more than 40 years ago, the observance celebrates the history and scope of Black music from classical and folk to hip hop and rock. For more on the origins and evolution of Black music Month, The Takeaway 's guest host Melissa Harris-Perr y spoke to Nabil Ayers , writer and general man
Telling the Stories of 'African Europeans'
'A new book recounts the history of African Europeans through stories of individuals who helped shape the continent, a history that goes back centuries. Olivette Otele , professor of history and memory of enslavement at the University of Bristol and vice president of the Royal Historical Society in the UK, joins All Of It to discuss her book, African Europeans: An Untold History .'

JUN 10

Film at Lincoln Center Podcast: In Conversation with Steve McQueen on Small Axe
'On this episode of Film at Lincoln Center Podcast , a conversation with Steve McQueen , the director of Small Axe , and Dennis Lim , Director of Programming for Film at Lincoln Center and the New York Film Festival.' Film at Lincoln Center Podcast · #338 - In Conversation with Steve McQueen on Small Axe
Hierarchy, Division and Filing Cabinets at the Dawn of the Information Age
'Media studies scholar Craig Robertson on the filing cabinet's work at the dawn of 20th century capitalism, the consequences of a logic centered around division and efficiency, and his book The Filing Cabinet: A Vertical History of Information from University of Minnesota Press.' -- This is Hell! This is Hell! · Hierarchy, division and filing cabinets at the dawn of the information age.
Celebrating 50 Years Of Philly Sound With Songwriter/Producer Thom Bell
(Steve Ringman/The Seattle Times) 'Born in Jamaica, Thom Bell moved to Philadelphia as a kid and went on to become one of the prime originators the Philly sound. With Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff , founders of Philadelphia International Records, Bell formed Mighty Three Music, a song publishing company. Originally broadcast in 2006.' -- Fresh Air

JUN 09

After Practice of "Race-Norming" is Exposed, Black Former Players Remain Skeptical of NFL
"The NFL admitted it had been using a practice known as “race-norming," which made it harder for Black players to qualify for a payout if they have dementia. For more on what the NFL's admission means for Black players, The Takeaway 's guest host Melissa Harris Perry spoke with Ken Jenkins , a former Washington Football Team running back, and Maryclaire Dale , legal affairs writer for the Associa
“Takeover”: New Doc Chronicles Historic 1970 Young Lords Occupation of Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx
'A new film called Takeover follows the 12 historic hours on July 14, 1970, when members of the Young Lords Party took over the rundown Lincoln Hospital in the South Bronx in New York City. The Young Lords were a radical group founded by Puerto Ricans modeled on the Black Panther Party. Democracy Now! co-host Juan González , a co-founder of the Young Lords, helped organize the action. Using archi
Coffee & Books with Marc Lamont Hill: Incarcerated Writer and Journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal
'On this episode of Coffee & Books , host Marc Lamont Hill talks with internationally celebrated writer, radio journalist, organizer and inspiration for the prison lawyers movement, Mumia Abu-Jamal , who has been incarcerated for 40 years. Over a period of several months the two discussed the effects prison has on writing and being creative, the lack of access prisoners have to books and what rol

JUN 08

Invisible Blackness – The Language of My Story, An Interview with Meshell Ndegeocello
'As a prolific multi instrumentalist and poetic intellectual, Meshell Ndegeocello ’s music weaves together sensual sentiments, spinning storytelling and activism into its own (sub)genre of soul. In this episode host Adrian Younge speaks with Meshell about the concept of feminism, language and her role in the evolution of Black music.'
This is The Byline Project
'Because local stories matter! Okayplayer has designed The Byline Project , an innovative open-source digital tool that aims to empower newsrooms and storytellers to tap into their networks to discover local, culturally significant and politically important stories that serve the public Using The Byline Project’s direct-to-reporter tipping feature, the online community can financially support the
Photography As Collaboration: A Conversation with Titus Brooks Heagins
'In this virtual conversation, acclaimed photographer Titus Brooks Heagins speaks with Dr. Jayne Ifekwunigwe of Duke University. Heagins has been a professional photographer for just over two decades, but his work is built on a lifetime of habits: of seeing, of listening, and of building relationships. Heagins explores a selection of his photographs and discusses the role of photography in docume

JUN 07

Poets on Couches: John Murillo & Nicole Sealey Read Anne Waldman
'Series 2 of Poets on Couches concludes with John Murillo and Nicole Sealey on their couch, reading and discussing "How to Write" by Anne Waldman . In these videograms from The Paris Review , poets read and discuss the poems getting them through these strange times—broadcasting straight from their couches to yours. These readings bring intimacy into our spaces of isolation, both through the affin
Kiese Laymon: “We Must Be Twice As Good As White People to Get Half As Much”
'We sometimes hear of artists selling the rights to their work – but we rarely hear of them buying those rights back. That is what award-winning author and professor Kiese Laymon has done. Eight years after their original publication, he is re-releasing two books. One is his debut novel, Long Division . The other is a bestselling collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in Ame
Power and Pride to the People! by Ben Jealous
| @BenJealous | special to NewBlackMan (in Exile) Happy Pride month to Black LGBTQ readers and to all of us who love LGBTQ people! June has become the traditional month for Pride celebrations in honor of the gay and transgender people, including Black and brown gay liberation and transgender rights activists like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, who fought back against harassment and abusive

JUN 06

Fat Joe: Tiny Desk (Home) Concert
'Latino hip-hop legend Fat Joe muscled his way out of the streets of the South Bronx with his debut album, Represent , in 1993. He radiates a different energy in 2021, sauntering in his own uptown streetwear shop, fresh fitted in pink leather and a designer bucket hat, but he's still got that old larger-than-life electricity. On this episode Tiny Desk (Home) Concert , Fat Joe performs a medley of
James Moore & Alicia Hall Moran: Solitude
'Music by Duke Ellington . Text by Eddie DeLange and Irving Mills . From James Moore and Alicia Hall Moran 's Send Back My Love: Songs After Duke Ellington's Solitude . This arrangement quotes and pays tribute to the gorgeous 1956 recording by Ella Fitzgerald and Barney Kessel . Recorded at Princeton University, Lewis Center for the Arts Oct 30, 2020.'

JUN 05

White Politics and Black History in Tulsa
'President J oe Biden went to Tulsa, Oklahoma to commemorate the fact that, in 1921, a White mob attacked an all-Black neighborhood there. It was one of the worst episodes of racial violence in US history, which historians think left 300 dead and 10,000 homeless. David M. Perry comments on the political issues around the historical facts —he’s a journalist and historian whose work has appeared in

JUN 04

Remembering Tulsa and Investing for Racial Equity
'Remembering the 100th Anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre that destroyed Black Wall Street, is America ready to invest in Black businesses and communities to bring about equity? Dr. Henry McKoy , Patrick Hannah , and Steve Rao join #BlackIssuesForum with Deborah Holt Noel to share views on Biden's proposed $6 Trillion Budget and it's efforts to achieve racial equity. Panel also comments on Naomi O
'High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America'
'Food historian Dr. Jessica B. Harris and journalist Stephen Satterfield , the founder of Whetstone magazine, join All Of It to discuss their new Netflix original docuseries called High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America which premiered on May 26. Based on one of Dr. Harris' books, the series explores African foodways in the U.S. and slavery's impact on American food as

JUN 03

Bringing Midwifery Back to Black Mothers
' In the face of disproportionate childbirth mortality rates, activists are fighting to make midwifery more available to Black mothers in the South.' -- The New Yorker
I Went Camping With...André Cymone's Best Stories About Prince, Rick James, and Changing Music Forever
'A rare and incredible interview with legendary bassist, producer and bandmate of #Prince , Andre Cymone´ . Hear the stories of the creation of the #Minneapolis sound, the craziness of #RickJames , and why #TomJones still sounds amazing. If you're a music fan or just wonder if Charlie Murphy 's True Hollywood stories are accurate, you'll want to give this episode of I Went Camping With a listen.'
How Michael Jackson's Complicated Legacy Impacts The Family's Music
' Jody Rosen recently explored the intersection of music and accountability for The Los Angeles Times after the re-release this year of expanded digital versions of the Jacksons’ albums . Almost every genre of music and dance has been influenced by Michael Jackson , the trailblazer of the group that first called themselves The Jackson 5. As he writes, Rosen says listening to music in general is s
Report Details How Black Girls are Disproportionately Affected by Covid-19 and Systemic Racism
'The pandemic, like so many disasters before it, revealed the sustained inequalities that underlie many aspects of American life, laying bare health disparities, housing instability, and workforce vulnerabilities. Left shouldering the heaviest burden was an often forgotten group: Black girls. A new report from A Long Walk Home , a Chicago-based non-profit advocating for racial and gender equity,

NewBlackMan (in Exile)